Health, Sports & Psychology

Bread

Updated Wednesday 27th April 2005

Ever Wondered About Food takes a look at bread

Kneading bread Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Used with permission

From unleavened Iron Age loaves to the ubiquitous sliced white, Ever Wondered brings you the story of the staff of life - Bread. Just when did bread turn white? What makes the perfect sandwich loaf? And how did British ingenuity and a pig mixer kick start the mass production of sliced white?

In the kitchen, Alan Coxon bakes flower-pot bread with his recipe for the lightest, whitest, fluffiest loaves, and Kathy Sykes explains how good bread is all in the flour and why you shouldn't eat your loaf straight hot from the oven.

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