Health, Sports & Psychology
  • Activity
  • 5 mins
  • Level 1: Introductory

Receipe: Chicken 'oyster' salad

Updated Saturday 30th April 2005

Try out our recipe from the Ever Wondered About Food series

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 24 chicken ‘oysters’ (6 per serving) - the ‘oyster’ is a piece of chicken which is oyster shaped and sits at the top of the muscle of the leg. Turn over the leg and pop out the oyster muscle, or ask your butcher to do this for you. It’s juicy brown meat.
  • 1 ciabatta loaf
  • olive oil for coating bread
  • 2 Romaine/Cos lettuces, washed
  • 1 bottle of your favourite Caesar dressing
  • vegetable oil and a knob of unsalted butter for frying

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 200ºC/400ºF/Gas mark 6.
  2. Remove the crusts on a ciabatta loaf and rip off random pieces of bread. In a bowl place enough olive oil to coat the ciabatta croutons lightly. Once coated in oil, place them on a roasting tray in the oven and cook for about 6 minutes, until crispy on the outside but doughy in the middle.
  3. Remove the outside leaves of the lettuce and place around a serving bowl.
  4. In a pan heat a little oil and fry the ‘oysters’ until brown and cooked. Fry them first skin down. Add a knob of butter at the end of the cooking process.
  5. Add the cooked ‘oysters’, croutons and parmesan flakes to the bowl of lettuce and dress the salad with caesar dressing. Make sure all the leaves are covered and serve.
 

For further information, take a look at our frequently asked questions which may give you the support you need.

Have a question?

Other content you may like

Tea smoked chicken Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: BBC article icon

Health, Sports & Psychology 

Tea smoked chicken

Try out our recipe from the Ever Wondered About Food series

Article
Recipe: Oysters Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Production team activity icon

Health, Sports & Psychology 

Recipe: Oysters

Try out our recipe from the Ever Wondered About Food series

Activity
Recipe: Coq au vin Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Production team activity icon

Health, Sports & Psychology 

Recipe: Coq au vin

Try out our recipe from the Ever Wondered About Food series

Activity
Understanding narratives in health care free course icon Level 1 icon

Health, Sports & Psychology 

Understanding narratives in health care

What are the ways in which others (patients, relatives, practitioners) and you create and share meanings within health care? Narratives are the stories used by individuals to make sense of events. In this free course, Understanding narratives in health care, you are guided on how to identify narratives, those that might either support or undermine health care practice.

Free course
5 hrs
Health science and light - International Year of Light Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Abidal | Dreamstime.com article icon

Health, Sports & Psychology 

Health science and light - International Year of Light

Free learning resources in health science, relating to light, as part of The Open University's International Year of Light celebrations.

Article
The lure of the ready meal Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Alterfalter | Dreamstime.com article icon

Health, Sports & Psychology 

The lure of the ready meal

How much are we influenced by perception when we buy our food?

Article
The Parkinson's problem Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: OU article icon

Health, Sports & Psychology 

The Parkinson's problem

Biochemist Birgit Liss is investigating the causes of Parkinson's Disease in the hope of finding a cure.

Article
What if I die before I get old? Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Used with permission article icon

Health, Sports & Psychology 

What if I die before I get old?

In the first of a series of posts on living with a shortened life expectancy, retired OU lecturer Jill Reynolds writes from the heart, and of her own experiences...

Article
Herbal medicine Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Production team article icon

Health, Sports & Psychology 

Herbal medicine

Caldar Bendle gives an overview of herbal medicine, its history and its role in medicine today.

Article