Health, Sports & Psychology
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Recipe: Quick and easy pesto

Updated Thursday 21st September 2006

Try out our recipe from the Ever Wondered About Food series

Serves 6

Ingredients

Pesto

  • 100g (3½oz) fresh basil
  • 85ml (3fl oz) extra virgin olive oil
  • 3 cloves garlic, peeled
  • 100g (3½oz) freshly grated parmesan
  • 100g (3½oz) pine nuts
  • salt and pepper

To serve

  • ciabatta / crusty bread

Method

  1. Put the basil, garlic, pine nuts and parmesan in a blender and switch on.
  2. Gradually add the olive oil and mix until the pesto is a stiff paste.
  3. Season to taste.
  4. Serve as a dip with warm crusty bread.

 

 

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