Journeys In Thought - Nietzsche In Switzerland

Updated Monday 24th October 2005

Nietzsche is often remembered as a miserable polemicist who proclaimed the death of God, before embracing a horse and going crazy in Turin . In fact, when this German-born genius arrived in the Swiss town of Basel in 1869, he was young, happy and full of optimism.

Nietzsche Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Mary Evans Picture Library

Just appointed to a full chair of classics at the University, he would remain in Switzerland, off and on, for the next decade; it was here that he would begin to make his name. While is Basel he published his first book, The Birth of Tragedy, including a sustained attack on Socrates and the supremacy of rationality.Nietzsche also reflected deeply on the role of the teacher in society; it was only when illness struck that Neitzsche allowed his own teaching commitments to slide.

Of enormous influence upon him was his friendship with Richard Wagner – from Basel, Nietzsche would routinely make the trip to Luzern where Wagner and his family lived. Nietzsche was treated as an honorary member of this family.

Interviewees for the programme include Angie Hobbs, Roger Scruton and Raimond Gaita. Interviews were also conducted in Basel itself and at the Wagner Museum in Luzern.

Journeys In Thought in more depth:

 

For further information, take a look at our frequently asked questions which may give you the support you need.

Have a question?

Other content you may like

Nietzsche Biography Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Mary Evans Picture Library article icon

History & The Arts 

Nietzsche Biography

Jonathan Rée summarizes the life and work of Friedrich Nietzsche.

Article
OU on the BBC: Shared Planet – Extended interviews Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: BBC article icon

TV, Radio & Events 

OU on the BBC: Shared Planet – Extended interviews

Each week we publish an extended interview from the BBC Radio 4 series Shared Planet. Catch up here.

Article
The Big Question: What is religion? Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: BBC article icon

TV, Radio & Events 

The Big Question: What is religion?

People on their knees, or a moral code? Is there something more to religion?

Article
OU on the BBC: Journeys In Thought - About The Series Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Used with permission article icon

TV, Radio & Events 

OU on the BBC: Journeys In Thought - About The Series

Journeys in Thought focuses on crucial turning points in the lives and thoughts of great philosophers. Each programme focuses on one location – a place significant in the intellectual development of our subjects' philosophical lives

Article
Take the survey: Working Mothers Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Godfer | Dreamstime.com activity icon

Education & Development 

Take the survey: Working Mothers

Is work working for our kids? Will shared parental leave give working mothers a more fulfilling career? Share your views and join the discussion.

Activity
Thinking Allowed - Women in combat Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Jupiter Images article icon

TV, Radio & Events 

Thinking Allowed - Women in combat

The focus of this week's Thinking Allowed is women in combat

Article
Breaking Science: Limb length, cancer, freezing water... Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: photos.com audio icon

TV, Radio & Events 

Breaking Science: Limb length, cancer, freezing water...

Effects of temperature on limb length, how the egg keeps fertilization to one sperm, and does boiling water freeze faster than cold?

Audio
30 mins
The Bottom Line - Invent it, make it, sell it Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: BBC article icon

TV, Radio & Events 

The Bottom Line - Invent it, make it, sell it

Evan Davis welcomes three more guests, each of whom have a story to tell about a product which shaped the fortunes of their business

Article
Thinking Allowed - The meaning of home Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Used with permission article icon

TV, Radio & Events 

Thinking Allowed - The meaning of home

As Thinking Allowed airs from the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA), our academic explores how the meaning of home has changed   

Article