The family at the centre of early learning
The family at the centre of early learning

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The family at the centre of early learning

References

Cameron, C.A., Pinto, G., Accorti Gamannossi, B., Hancock, R. and Tapanya, S. (2011) ‘Domestic play collaborations in diverse family contexts’, Australasian Journal of Early Childhood, vol. 36, no. 4, pp. 78–85.
Dadds, M. (2002) ‘The “hurry-along” curriculum’, in Pollard, A. (ed.) Readings for Reflective Teaching, London, Continuum, pp. 173–5.
Deloache, J.S. and Gottlieb, A. (eds) (2000) A World of Babies: Imagined Childcare Guides for Seven Societies, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.
Gottlieb, A. (2004) The Afterlife is Where We Come From: The Culture of Infancy in West Africa, Chicago, University of Chicago Press [Online]. Available at http://www.press.uchicago.edu/ index.html [Tip: hold Ctrl and click a link to open it in a new tab. (Hide tip)] (Accessed 18 February 2016).
Illich, I. (1971) Deschooling Society, Harmondsworth, Penguin.
Jessel, J., Kenner, C., Gregory, E., Ruby, M. and Arju, T. (2011) ‘Different spaces: learning and literacy with children and their grandparents in East London homes’, Linguistics and Education, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 37–50.
Needham, M. and Jackson, D. (2012) ‘Stay and play or play and chat; comparing roles and purposes in case studies of English and Australian supported playgroups’, European Early Childhood Education Research Journal, vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 163–76.
Penn, H. (2008) Understanding Early Childhood: Issues and Controversies, 2nd edn, Maidenhead, Open University Press.
Penn, H. and McQuail, S. (1997) Childcare as a Gendered Occupation, Research Report no. 23, London, Department for Education and Employment.
Roberts, R. (2011) ‘Companionable learning: a mechanism for holistic well-being development from birth’, European Early Childhood Education Research Journal, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 195–205.
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