Carnival and the performance of heritage: Track 1

Featuring: Video Video Audio Audio

There's a lot more to Notting Hill Carnival than a great street party. This album gives you a true insider guide, by some of the people who have made the Carnival what it is today. Its story reaches back to the darkest recesses of European tradition, through Colonialism and slavery, to racist Britain of the 1950’s and 60’s. It merges contemporary ideas with art forms reaching back via the Caribbean slave plantations to tribal Africa. And its setting in West London brings out a history of the area which some of its residents might prefer to forget. The album also contains academic perspectives from Susie West, Lecturer in Heritage Studies at The Open University; Hakim Adi, Reader in the History of Africa and the African Diaspora at Middlesex University; and Ruth Tompsett, Visiting Lecturer in Carnival Studies at Middlesex University. This material forms part of The Open University Course AD281 Understanding global heritage.

By: The iTunes U team (Programme and web teams)

  • Duration 1 hour 45 mins
  • Updated Wednesday 15th July 2009
  • Introductory level
  • Posted under History & The Arts
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Track 1: Carnival and the performance of heritage

An introduction to this album.


© The Open University 2009


Tracks in this podcast:

Track   Title Description
1 Carnival and the performance of heritage    An introduction to this album. Play now Carnival and the performance of heritage
2 Notting Hill Carnival: history    The development of Notting Hill Carnival from Britain's recruitment of Carribean workers in the 1940's to the present day. Play now Notting Hill Carnival: history
3 Notting Hill Carnival: challenges    How can Notting Hill Carnival be managed as a mass tourism event without compromising artistic integrity or losing touch with its roots? Play now Notting Hill Carnival: challenges
4 Notting Hill Carnival: artistic traditions    What artistic traditions does Notting Hill Carnival draw upon and what's unique about its performances? Play now Notting Hill Carnival: artistic traditions
5 Notting Hill Carnival: multiculturalism    Why Notting Hill? Because for many Afro-Carribeans, Notting Hill is awash with memories: here are just a few. Play now Notting Hill Carnival: multiculturalism
6 Global heritage: course taster    A sample of some of the ideas and case studies covered in the course AD281 Understanding global heritage. Play now Global heritage: course taster
7 History perspective: Susie West    Dr Susie West of The Open University talks about the ideas in the film. Play now History perspective: Susie West
8 History perspective: Ruth Tompsett    Professor Ruth Tompsett of Middlesex University talks about the ideas in the film. Play now History perspective: Ruth Tompsett
9 Challenges perspective: Susie West    Dr Susie West of The Open University talks about the ideas in the film. Play now Challenges perspective: Susie West
10 Challenges perspective: Hakim Adi    Dr Hakim Adi of Middlesex University talks about the ideas in the film. Play now Challenges perspective: Hakim Adi
11 Artistic traditions perspective: Susie West    Dr Susie West of The Open University talks about the ideas in the film. Play now Artistic traditions perspective: Susie West
12 Artistic traditions perspective: Ruth Tompsett    Professor Ruth Tompsett of Middlesex University talks about the ideas in the film. Play now Artistic traditions perspective: Ruth Tompsett
13 Multiculturalism perspective: Susie West    Dr Susie West of The Open University talks about the ideas in the film. Play now Multiculturalism perspective: Susie West
14 Multiculturalism perspective: Hakim Adi    Dr Hakim Adi of Middlesex University talks about the ideas in the film. Play now Multiculturalism perspective: Hakim Adi
15 Studying global heritage    Dr Rodney Harrison talks about studying The Open University's Course AD281: Understanding global heritage. Play now Studying global heritage
16 Global heritage: case studies    Dr Rodney Harrison talks about the audio and video case studies that are integral to the course AD281: Understanding global heritage. Play now Global heritage: case studies
17 Critical heritage studies    Dr Rodney Harrison, course chair of the course AD281 Understanding global heritage, explains the concept of critical heritage studies. Play now Critical heritage studies

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