Debate: BBC English

Updated Thursday 16th February 2006

Forum guest Kev asked about the accents we hear on television and radio.

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When the BBC started the first dialect used was very 'proper',as such this was the marker for 'BBC' english. With the rapid expansion of the BBC, i would be interested to find out what the most popular dialect is on tv.

Would you rather hear a Geordie or Scouser reading the news? Would a Scots accent be preferred when watching the weather? Or would a Somerset dialect be good for a children's programme?

Any other dialects that are not represented on the BBC?

 

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