Debate: BBC English

Updated Thursday 16th February 2006

Forum guest Kev asked about the accents we hear on television and radio.

Speech bubbles Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Jupiter Images

When the BBC started the first dialect used was very 'proper',as such this was the marker for 'BBC' english. With the rapid expansion of the BBC, i would be interested to find out what the most popular dialect is on tv.

Would you rather hear a Geordie or Scouser reading the news? Would a Scots accent be preferred when watching the weather? Or would a Somerset dialect be good for a children's programme?

Any other dialects that are not represented on the BBC?

 

For further information, take a look at our frequently asked questions which may give you the support you need.

Have a question?

Other content you may like

Loss of diversity and the English language Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Jupiter Images article icon

History & The Arts 

Loss of diversity and the English language

Dr Daniel Allington thinks loss of diversity has impacted on the development of the English Language the most

Article
Debate: Dumbing or loosening? Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Jupiter Images article icon

History & The Arts 

Debate: Dumbing or loosening?

Simon from the Open2 team wondered what forum members made of a change in a bank's language

Article
Language of Comedy - Creating a character Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: The Open University video icon

History & The Arts 

Language of Comedy - Creating a character

How do comedians exploit regional variety in comedy? Sheffield comedian Graham Fellows uses his character John Shuttleworth to illustrate.

Video
5 mins
Language of Comedy - Social class Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: The Open University video icon

History & The Arts 

Language of Comedy - Social class

The Fast Show writer Charlie Higson discusses how social class and dialects are used as a topic for comedy. 

Video
5 mins
Exploring the English language Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Used with permission free course icon Level 2 icon

History & The Arts 

Exploring the English language

How has the English language changed over the course of the last 500 years? What are the social and political contexts that have affected how these changes have come about? This free course, Exploring the English language, will consider the development of the English language from the 15th to the 19th century.

Free course
9 hrs
Ta, cheers, much obliged: A brief history of 'thanks' in English Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Shininghope | Dreamstime.com - Thank You Photo article icon

History & The Arts 

Ta, cheers, much obliged: A brief history of 'thanks' in English

There's more to just saying thank you than you think.

Article
Globalisation and the English language Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Production team article icon

History & The Arts 

Globalisation and the English language

Globalisation has influenced the evolution of the English language the most, according to Dr Maria Leedham, in this short piece based on the transcript of a phone interview.

Article
Star Wars VII: Myth and fairy tale Creative commons image Icon Kristina Alexanderson under CC-BY-NC-ND-2.0 licence under Creative-Commons license article icon

History & The Arts 

Star Wars VII: Myth and fairy tale

What storytelling styles and genres can be applied to Star Wars? Sara Haslam investigates...

Article
From old English to modern English Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Thinkstock article icon

History & The Arts 

From old English to modern English

Marisa Lohr traces the origins and development of the English language, from its early beginnings around 450 AD to the modern global language we use today.

Article