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Debate: The England team

Updated Thursday 16th June 2005

Forum member Akfarrar asked why the BBC seems happy to use the clunking phrase the England team?

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Is it me (old age, drinking out of wet glasses, baldness), or is the BBC becoming illiterate?

The England captain: What happened to the captain of England or the English Captain?

I don't hear (simply an eg from the same news broadcast): An Israel Air strike - they say Israeli air strike.

 

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