Debate: The England team

Updated Thursday 16th June 2005

Forum member Akfarrar asked why the BBC seems happy to use the clunking phrase the England team?

Speech bubbles Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Jupiter Images

Is it me (old age, drinking out of wet glasses, baldness), or is the BBC becoming illiterate?

The England captain: What happened to the captain of England or the English Captain?

I don't hear (simply an eg from the same news broadcast): An Israel Air strike - they say Israeli air strike.

 

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