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Amanda: Now might I do it pat, now he is praying. And now I’ll do it. And so he goes to heaven, and so am I revenged. That would be scann’d, a villain kills my father, and for that, I, his sole son, do this villain send to heaven. O, this is hire and salary, not revenge. He took my father grossly …

Tim Pigott-Smith: Okay. To get you away from him do O that would be hire and salary, not revenge, to us.

Amanda: Right.

Tim Pigott-Smith: Tell us that. So you’re absolutely on him. That would be scann’d …

Amanda: That would be scann’d, a villain kills my father and for that I, his sole son, do this same villain send to heaven. O, this is hire and salary, not revenge. He took my father grossly, full of bread, with all his crimes broad blown, as flush as May, and how his audit stands who knows save heaven? But in our circumstance and cause of thought, ‘tis …

Tim Pigott-Smith: Okay. I think, I think the bit about Claudius, and this of course comes profoundly from, I mean there are all these debate about whether Shakespeare was a Catholic and all, but this comes from an absolutely Catholic notion of, if you haven’t confessed and put your soul to rest and died properly, your soul will be in eternal torment, which of course is what he knows his father to be in because he’s met the ghost, who is, until this crime can be revenged, his spirit is doomed to walk the eternal night.

Amanda: Yes.

Tim Pigott-Smith: And they believe that, think of those erroneous Bosch paintings of hell, the devils, you know, real, you know, it’s absolutely what he’s saying. He took my father grossly, full of bread, with all his crimes flush upon his head. You know, well that’s a terrible thing to do.

Amanda: Yes.

Tim Pigott-Smith:
You know, it’s a double crime, just to have killed him when he was unseasoned for his passing.

Amanda: Yes, yes.

Tim Pigott-Smith: Yeah, it’s terrible, the religious weight of that is very powerful. And so when you say hire and salary I think you need to share that one with us, do that one to the camera, this is hire and salary, not revenge. And then, he took my father grossly, he took my father, weigh it up, he did really, really, really terrible things and is it then right for me to send him as a punishment to heaven? Oh come on.

Amanda: Right.

Tim Pigott-Smith:
So go from, oh this is hire and salary, because I think we’re really okay up to then, Amanda, are you okay?

Amanda: Oh this is hire and salary, not revenge. That would scann’d, a villain kills my father and for that I, his sole son, do this same villain send to heaven. O, this is hire and salary not revenge. He took my father grossly, full of bread, with all his crimes broad blown as flush as May, and how his audit stands who knows save heaven? But in our circumstance and cause of thought ‘tis heavy with him, and am I then revenged to take him in the purging of his soul, when he is fit and seasoned for his passage? No!

Tim Pigott-Smith: Good, good.

Amanda: Up, sword, and know thou a more horrid hent. When he is drunk asleep, or in his rage, or in the incestuous pleasure of his bed …

Tim Pigott-Smith: Yeah. You know the way Alex was berating the throne. Take it up! There’s a bit of that. I’ll get him when he’s really, you know. It’s immature and, you know, I’ll really do it, oh really, really, you know. Yeah, just on the text, and how his audit stands with him, who knows save heaven? And it seems to me something that’s set up is if you use, oh this is hire and salary, not revenge, that thought is open to us.

Amanda: Yes.

Tim Pigott-Smith:
He took my father grossly with crimes broad blown, you know, and how his audit stands who knows save heaven. But in our circumstance and way of thought is heavy with him. You know, and that seems to me, that’s another thought comes out to be shared, it’s not, you know, I mean, I’m right aren’t I?

Amanda:
Yes.

Tim Pigott-Smith:
I just, I want you to, you know, share how right I am not to do it now.

Amanda:
Yes, yeah.

Tim Pigott-Smith:
Sort of thing.

Amanda: Yes, yeah, yeah, yeah.

Tim Pigott-Smith:
And then where does it go to, ‘tis heavy with him.

Amanda: ‘Tis heavy with him and am I then revenged to take him …

Tim Pigott-Smith:
Yes, exactly.

Amanda: … in the purging of his soul when he is fit and seasoned for his passage.

Tim Pigott-Smith:
Yes, exactly. And you’ve got yourself right above him and the word no is a sentence all on its own right at the end of the line, and you did that perfectly so you clocked that, that’s dead right. No! Up, sword – but don’t look at it just put it up.

Amanda: Right, right.

Tim Pigott-Smith: People who are used to wearing swords don’t look at them, we do. No, get out of the bloody way I’ll find out what I’ll do, and then you get into it.

Amanda: I’ll get him, right.

Tim Pigott-Smith:
So go from and how his audit stands with him, and how his audit stands.

Amanda: And how his audit stands who knows save heaven. But in our circumstance and cause of thought ‘tis heavy with him. And am I then revenged to take him in the purging of his soul when he is fit and seasoned for his passage?
No!

Tim Pigott-Smith:
Good, good.

Amanda: Up, sword! And know thou a more horrid hent. When he is drunk asleep, or in his rage, or in incestuous pleasure of his bed. At gaming, swearing, or about some act that has no relish of salvation in't, then trip him, that his heels may kick at heaven, and that his soul may be as damned and black as hell, whereto it goes. My mother stays …

Tim Pigott-Smith:
Okay. Now I think you’re really absolutely on it and you’re using the language, trip him that his heels may kick at heaven and that his soul may be as damned and black as, those sounds, as hell where to it goes - I think that should be around him. The convention is very clear that Claudius cannot hear you, so you could even go as black as hell. Oh gosh mum, I said mum her, this is just, you’re lucky, yeah?

Amanda: Yes, yeah.

Tim Pigott-Smith: It’s kind of in a way, it’s easier to do this speech because it comes from the principle of action - it’s the only one that does, you know, and I think it’s a huge relief. Peter O’Toole had a theory that the whole thing was done to the patron saint of Ireland, “Now might I do it, Pat”.

[Laughter]

Amanda: Oh that’s right.

Tim Pigott-Smith: Helps keep it light. So, but just do this last bit again, Amanda, and then we’ll do it, do it all.

Amanda: My God.

Tim Pigott-Smith:
So, and am I then revenged? Moving back towards Claudius for no.

Amanda: So from no?

Tim Pigott-Smith:
Yeah, go from no.

Amanda: Up sword.

Tim Pigott-Smith:
Up sword, yes, you’re right to think to move away from him, and know thou a more horrid hent.

Amanda: No! Up, sword. And know thou a more horrid hent. When he is drunk asleep, or in his rage, or in incestuous pleasure of his bed, at gaming, swearing, or about some act that has no sense of relish in't …

Tim Pigott-Smith:
You’ve got to go for act, or about some act!

Amanda:
Right, or about, okay.

Tim Pigott-Smith:
Yeah. It’s there on the line, on the page, the last line.

Amanda: Yes.

Tim Pigott-Smith:
And I think, I don’t whether I’m right, but I feel that when you talk about him there it’s not right. You need to be talking about him, you know, as opposed to praying. I want to get him when he is doing something nasty. So you’re right to do up sword, no, that’s a more horrid hent. What’s the next line?

Amanda:
When he is drunk, asleep or in his rage.

Tim Pigott-Smith: Yeah.

Amanda: Up, sword. And know thou a more horrid hent. When he is drunk asleep, or in his rage, or in the incestuous pleasure of his bed, at gaming, swearing, or about some act that has some act?

Tim Pigott-Smith: That has no relish of salvation.

Amanda:
That’s it. So what’s that point, was it act?

Tim Pigott-Smith:
Some act, yes.

Amanda:
That’s it, that was it there.

Tim Pigott-Smith:
There is something desperate about it, about some anything!

Amanda: Some act, right.

Tim Pigott-Smith: That has no …

Amanda:
Relish of salvation.

Tim Pigott-Smith:
Relish of salvation, no mustard on it.

Amanda: Right. Up, sword, and know thou a more horrid hent. When he is drunk asleep, or in his rage, or in the incestuous pleasure of his bed, at gaming, swearing, or about some act that has no relish of salvation in't, then trip him, that his heels may kick at heaven, and that his soul may be as damned and black as hell whereto it goes. My mother stays, this physic but prolongs thy sickly days.

Tim Pigott-Smith: Good, good, good. We’ll do it all again, yeah, I don’t, when you get to and that his soul may be as damned, don’t rush through it. His soul may be as damned and black as hell where to it goes, and then quickly, on the line, my mother stays. And then quickly on the line, not stop, think, speak, you know what I mean?

Amanda: Yes.

Tim Pigott-Smith: It’s because you are, it’s early days, don’t let it hang, oh I think you’re bloody lucky to be alive if you are, with me feeling the way I feel. Okay?

Amanda: Right, yeah.

Tim Pigott-Smith:
Okay, Want to go from the top?

Amanda: Okay. Now might I do it pat, now he is a praying, and now I'll do it, and so he goes to heaven, and so am I revenged. That would be scann’d. A villain kills my father, and for that I, his sole son, do this same villain send to heaven. Oh, this is hire and salary, not revenge. He took my father grossly, full of bread, with all his crimes broad blown, as flush as May, and how his audit stands who knows save heaven? But in our circumstance and course of thought, ‘tis heavy with him, and am I then revenged to take him in the purging of his soul, when he is fit and seasoned for his passage? No! Up, sword, and know thou a more horrid hent. When he is drunk asleep, or in his rage, or in the incestuous pleasure of his bed, at gaming, swearing, or about some act that has no relish of salvation in't, then trip him, that his heels may kick at heaven, and that his soul may be as damned and black as hell whereto it goes. My mother stays, this physic but prolongs thy sickly days.