Debate: Barenboim on Desert Island Discs

Updated Sunday 7th May 2006

Richard Langham-Smith of The Open University asked if anyone had caught 2006 Reith Lecturer Daniel Barenboim on his related visit to Sue Lawley's music-and-memory programme.

Close-up of a trumpet Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Jupiter Images

I wonder if anyone heard Desert Island Discs today where Barenboim once again engaged with Sue Lawley, attempted to imitate the spoken voices of Janet Baker and Clifford Curzon, and chose his favourite, somewhat predicatable, favourite recordings? An interesting complement to the Reith Lectures, I thought.

Worth a 'listen again' ?

 

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