Debate: What about the tone deaf

Updated Thursday 29th June 2006

Forum visitor Garry Ladd heard Daniel Barenboim's suggestion that music could bring peace. But he had a worry...

Accordion close-up Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Jupiter Images

Access to tonal recognition is not available for a sizable minority of some populations (Britain's for sure)

does this preclude this part of the population from the experience that Daniel is suggesting can 'benefit' the world?

 

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