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Guy Fawkes: Why do we celebrate?

Updated Thursday 4th November 2010

To celebrate Guy Fawkes night, we explore all things that go bang and dip into some of the history.

Fireworks by Italy at the 2012 Celebration of Light festival, Vancouver. Creative commons image Icon Tom Magliery licensed for reuse under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 under Creative-Commons license
 

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