Exploring Greek vases: Track 1

Featuring: Video Video

What can you learn about an archaic community from the art they created? Can the way in which their artefacts are displayed enhance the experience of viewing it? Very few remains still exist from Ancient Greek culture on the whole. However because of the durability of the material, pottery is a large part of the archaeological record from this period in Greece’s history, and as a result these vases have exerted a disproportionately large influence on our understanding of Greek society. These films show how you can an insight into Greek civilisation by observing the designs on the ceramics that have been acquired by these museums. The Open University’s Jessica Hughes analyses their religious mythology and Lucilla Burns discusses presentation at the Fitzwilliam museum in Cambridge.

By: The iTunes U team (Programme and web teams)

  • Duration 5 mins
  • Updated Tuesday 21st February 2012
  • Introductory level
  • Posted under History & The Arts
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Track 1: Encountering a Greek Vase

Jessica Hughes from The Open University examines the history of a Greek vase.


© The Open University 2012


Tracks in this podcast:

Track   Title Description
1 Encountering a Greek Vase    Jessica Hughes from The Open University examines the history of a Greek vase. Play now Encountering a Greek Vase

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