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What makes a great speech?: Track 1

Featuring: Audio Audio

Throughout history great orators have been able to capture a shift in the zeitgeist, and tap into an audience’s emotions. Speeches by John. F. Kennedy and Winston Churchill are considered among the greatest speeches of all time; but what made their speeches greater than the sum of their parts - and how did their structure and delivery manage to strike a chord that continues to resonate with people today? With contributions from Tony Blair’s ex speech writer Simon Lancaster and Tom Clark Editor of historic 20th Century speeches, this audio collection explores the methods and techniques used in great speeches that have allowed them to stand the test of time. This material forms part of The Open University course A150 Voices and Texts

By: The iTunes U team (Programme and web teams)

  • Duration 20 mins
  • Updated Friday 16th August 2013
  • Introductory level
  • Posted under History
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Track 1: Rhetoric

Simon Lancaster and Tom Clark touch upon the history of speeches


© The Open University


Tracks in this podcast:

Track   Title Description
1 Rhetoric    Simon Lancaster and Tom Clark touch upon the history of speeches Play now Rhetoric
2 Historical context    Capturing a moment in history Play now Historical context
3 Metaphor and contrast    Techniques used to enhance a speech Play now Metaphor and contrast
4 Flattery and Empathy    Techniques to engage an audience Play now Flattery and Empathy
5 Emotional connection    Establishing on an emotional connection Play now Emotional connection

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