Debate: Fulford Gate, 1066

Updated Friday 19th September 2008

Forum guest Huscarl recalled a day when the British were not covered in glory

A public meeting Copyrighted image Icon Copyrighted image Copyright: Jupiter Images

Memoriam of a great but tragic battle for the English...

The mighty Norse king Hardrada ('ruthless') left between c.3000 of his 12,000 strong Norse fleet - veterans of over 20yrs of bitter and savage internecine warfare- at Riccall to guard the precious treasures and longships, and with the rest of his c.6,000 men he marches inland towards York (maybe half-expecting a submissive welcome from the Norse descendants at York, as Tostig had promised- esp. as English remnant armies had been brushed aside down the N.East coast during the past few days).

Hardraada's army marched towards York without their chainmail (due to the unseasonably hot September weather) soon finds it's path blocked by the huge army under Earls Edwin (Mercia) commanding the Saxon right (opposite Hardraada and his Norsemen) and Morcar (N'bria)the left (opposite his nemesis Tostig and the Flamish)

 

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