A defeat and surrender had a bloody aftermath at Philiphaugh

By: The Civil War team (Programme and web teams)

  • Duration 5 mins
  • Updated Sunday 7th January 2001
  • Introductory level
  • Posted under World History
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In September 1645, the good fortune of the Earl of Montrose finally ran out.

Having evaded the Covenanting forces for over a year, he was eventually run to earth at Philiphaugh on the Yarrow. Outnumbered three to one, Montrose was persuaded to flee from battle and disappear back into the Highlands.

Antrim's Irish contingent, however, exhausted from over a year of guerilla warfare and Highland living, conceded defeat and surrendered on the understanding that their lives would be spared. The Covenanters and Campbells quickly broke their word and slaughtered every man, woman and boy - hanging and drowning the last stragglers. Just one more bloody episode in the epic MacDonald - Campbell feud, but a major blow to Royalist hopes in Scotland.

The Covenaters' memorial at Philiphaugh

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