James Berry: Windrush songs: Track 1

Featuring: Audio Audio

How does a poet represent two distinctly different cultures in their work? How did James Berry interpret his experience and those of other Jamaican’s that migrated to England in the late 1940’s into his writing? James Berry was born in Jamaica in 1924, but moved to England during the wave of immigration from the West Indies led by the Empire Windrush. From a young age Berry had an interest in language, and showed an aptitude for spoken word and through writing soon realised he could explore the world from different perspectives. He became part of a new generation of post-colonial poets who drew inspiration from their country of birth in addition to British culture. This album focuses on a selection of poems from his collection titled Windrush songs. This material forms part of The Open University course A230 Reading and studying literature.

By: The iTunes U team (Programme and web teams)

  • Duration 20 mins
  • Updated Wednesday 19th October 2011
  • Intermediate level
  • Posted under History & The Arts
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Track 1: James Berry

An introduction to the poet, his life and how his experiences influenced his work.


© The Open University 2011


Tracks in this podcast:

Track   Title Description
1 James Berry    An introduction to the poet, his life and how his experiences influenced his work. Play now James Berry
2 Empire Day    James Berry reads Empire Day. Play now Empire Day
3 Englan Voice    James Berry discusses language and reads ‘Englan Voice’. Play now Englan Voice
4 Reminiscence Voice    James Berry reads ‘Reminiscence Voice’. Play now Reminiscence Voice
5 Reasons for leaving Jamaica    James Berry explains his reasons for leaving Jamaica then reads the poem. Play now Reasons for leaving Jamaica
6 To Travel this Ship    James Berry discusses crime in Jamaica and reads ‘To Travel this Ship’. Play now To Travel this Ship

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