Making sense of art history
Making sense of art history

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Making sense of art history

Acknowledgements

Course image: geir tønnessen [Tip: hold Ctrl and click a link to open it in a new tab. (Hide tip)] in Flickr made available under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence.

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this course:

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary and used under licence (not subject to Creative Commons licence). See Terms and Conditions.

Special Restriction:

In order to benefit from this OpenLearn course and the teaching/learning objectives incorporated, the artwork acknowledged below must be used in context at all times and must not be used separately or with any other materials. The acknowledgements must be easily accessible and identifiable to users at all times.

The material acknowledged below is Proprietary and used under licence (not subject to Creative Commons Licence). See terms and conditions.

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following:

Plate 3.1 Rachel Whitehead, House, 1993. © The artist. Courtesy Cagosian Gallery. Photo: Tate Photography.

Gilbert and George, Life from Death Hope Life Fear, 1984, handcoloured photographs, framed on paper, unique. © Gilbert and George. Courtesy Tate, London, 2005.

Jake and Dinos Chapman, CFC76311561.1, 2002, painted bronze, 92 x 58 x 49 cm. © The artists. Courtesy Jay Jopling/White Cube, London. Photo: Gareth Winters.

Tracey Emin, My Bed, 1998, mattress, bed, lined, pillows, suitcase, ephemera, 79 x 211 x 234 cm. © The artist. Courtesy Jay Jopling/White Cube, London.

Damien Hirst, Mother and Child Divided, 1993, steel, GRP composites, glass, silicone sealants, cow, calf, formaldehyde solution, tanks: 190 x 323 x 109 cm and 103 x 169 x 63 cm. © Damien Hirst. All rights reserved DACS 2009.

Plate 3.3 Anish Kapoor, As If to Celebrate, I Discovered a Mountain Blooming with Red Flowers, 1981, drawing, wood and mixed media, 97 x 77 x 160 cm object, 33 x 71 x 82 cm object, 21 x 16 x 47 cm sculpture. © Tate, London.

Plate 3.4 Chris Ofili, No Woman No Cry, 1998, acrylic paint, oil paint, resin, pencil, paper collage, Letraset, glitter, map pins and elephant dung on linen with two dung supports, 244 x 183 x 5 cm © Chris Ofili. Courtesy of Chris Ofili – Afroco and Victoria Miro Gallery Tate Photography.

Plate 3.5 Paula Rego, The Maids, 1987, acrylic on canvas backed paper, 214 x 244 cm. Courtesy The Saatchi Gallery.

Plate 3.6 Tomoko Takahashi, Learning How to Drive, 2000, mixed media installation, dimensions variable. © Courtesy of the artist and Hales Gallery. Photo: Tate Photography/Mark Heathcote.

Plate 3.9 Chris Ofili, Afrodizzia, 2nd version, 1996, acrylic, oil, resin, paper collage, glitter, map pins and elephant dung on canvas with two dung supports, 244 x 183cm. © Chris Ofilli, Courtesy of Chris Ofili – Afroco and Victoria Miro Gallery.

Plate 3.10 Fiona Rae, Untitled (yellow), 1990, oil on canvas support, 214 x 198 cm. © Fiona Rae. Courtesy Timothy Taylor Gallery. Photo: Tate Photography.

Plate 3.13 Grayson Perry, Golden Ghosts, 2001, earthenware, 64 x 27 x 27 cm. Courtesy © The artist and Victoria Miro Gallery, London.

Plate 3.14 Tracey Emin, In My Family When Someone Dies They Are Cremated And Their Ashes Are Thrown Across The Sea, 1997, plaste, white paint, eleven seafulls, 450 x 555 x 413 cm (variable) installation. © The artist. Courtesy Jay Jopling/White Cube, London. Photo: Stephen White.

Plate 3.15 Paula Rego, The Dance, 1988, acrylic on paper laid on canvas support, 213 x 274 cm © The artist. Courtesy Tate, London, 2005.

Plate 3.16 Paula Rego, The Policeman’s Daughter, 1987, acrylic on canvas backed paper, 214 x 53 cm. © The artist. Courtesy The Saatchi Gallery, London.

Plate 3.17 Tracey Emin, The Perfect Place to Grow, 2001, wooden shed and trestle, plants, with a single monitor, super-8 film transferred to colour video, audio track, 2 minutes looped, 216 x 83 x 162 cm installation. © The artist. Courtesy Jay Jopling/White Cube, London. Photo: Stephen White.

Plate 3.18 Raphael, Madonna im Grünen (Madonna of the Meadow), 1505 or 1506, oil on wood panel, 113 x 89 cm. Kunsthistorisches Museum, Wien oder, KHM, Wien.

Copyright © The British Library

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