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Religion in history: conflict, conversion and coexistence: Track 1

Featuring: Audio Audio

The coexistence of multiple religious communities has been a source of both opposition and diversity since the very foundation of human civilization. This album explores the interaction of competing communities in compelling depth, highlighting periods and cities that experienced turbulence, and occasionally harmony, from such an intermingling of beliefs and ideas. A huge historical range, from the very beginnings of early Christianity to modern-day Africa, is rigorously examined in cultural, social and ideological terms. This material forms part of The Open University course AA307 Religion in history: conflict, conversion and coexistence.

By: The iTunes U team (Programme and web teams)

  • Duration 2 hours
  • Updated Friday 7th August 2009
  • Introductory level
  • Posted under History & The Arts
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Track 1: Religion in history: conflict, conversion and co-existence

A short introduction to this album.


© The Open University 2009


Tracks in this podcast:

Track   Title Description
1 Religion in history: conflict, conversion and co-existence    A short introduction to this album. Play now Religion in history: conflict, conversion and co-existence
2 Christianity in context    Professor David Chichester casts an illuminating eye over the global history of Christianity, from its early rise to modern expansions and prominence in Africa and America. Play now Christianity in context
3 Byzantine and late Roman religions    From the 3rd to the 7th Century, many religious groups experienced expansion and growing interaction, creating an illuminating clash of cultures, ideas and beliefs. Play now Byzantine and late Roman religions
4 The crusades    From the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Cambridge, Professor Jonathan Riley-Smith discusses the cultural and historical context of the crusades, why they occurred, and the inconsistencies in modern interpretation. Play now The crusades
5 The Bengal Renaissance    The 19th Century was a turning point in Indian religious and cultural history, with colonial expansion providing education and a hybridisation of East and West. This lively discussion tracks these changes and their legacy. Play now The Bengal Renaissance

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