The Arts Past and Present: Diva: Track 1

Featuring: Video Video Audio Audio

How do you get to be one of the great operatic divas? Catherine Rogers might just have what it takes to be a famous opera singer, but she still has lots of work to do. This album gives us an insight into the immense effort it requires to become a musical performer. As well as singing, acting, language, and stage skills all need to be honed. Catherine tackles the tragic aria of the Countess in Mozart's Marriage of Figaro and is praised by her tutors. In the audio track Elaine Moohan from the Music Department at The Open University unpicks some of the issues emerging from Catherine's story, and suggests that it's not good for one's reputation to develop a diva-like personality! This material forms part of The Open University course, A100 The arts past and present.

By: The iTunes U team (Programme and web teams)

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Track 1: The Arts Past and Present: Diva

A short introduction to this album


© The Open University 2009


Tracks in this podcast:

Track   Title Description
1 The Arts Past and Present: Diva    A short introduction to this album Play now The Arts Past and Present: Diva
2 Catherine Rogers: future diva?    Introducing Catherine Rogers, aspiring operatic diva Play now Catherine Rogers: future diva?
3 Learning the aria    Catherine works with her tutor on an aria from The Marriage of Figaro Play now Learning the aria
4 Honing acting skills    Working with a director to develop stagecraft and performance skills Play now Honing acting skills
5 The performance    Catherine’s first performance as The Countess Play now The performance
6 Reaction to the performance    Catherine’s reactions to video of her performance Play now Reaction to the performance
7 The tutors' opinion    What Catherine’s tutors thought of her performance Play now The tutors' opinion
8 Don't Be a Diva!    Open University academic Elaine Moohan draws parallels between studying opera and studying any subject, and explains why feedback is constructive. Play now Don't Be a Diva!

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