The Arts Past and Present: the Benin Bronzes: Track 1

Featuring: Video Video Audio Audio

Are ancient sculptures ethnographic artefacts or works of art? How can objects like these throw light on the relationship of our culture to other cultures, both in the past and in the present? This album explores some of the issues surrounding interpretation and display of bronze sculptures originating in Benin in West Africa. The video explores the academic dilemmas behind decisions that Western curators have to make about how the pieces should be displayed. In the supporting audio, Open University academic Paul Wood unpicks some of the issues arising from the film. This material forms part of The Open University course AA100 The arts past and present.

By: The iTunes U team (Programme and web teams)

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Track 1: The arts past and present: the Benin Bronzes

A short introduction to this album.


© The Open University 2009


Tracks in this podcast:

Track   Title Description
1 The arts past and present: the Benin Bronzes    A short introduction to this album. Play now The arts past and present: the Benin Bronzes
2 Exhibiting the Benin Bronzes    The academic dilemmas behind curatorial decisions on ways of displaying the Benin Bronzes. Play now Exhibiting the Benin Bronzes
3 Ethnographic artefacts or works of art?    Open University academic Paul Wood explores some of the issues surrounding classification of objects such as the Benin Bronzes. Play now Ethnographic artefacts or works of art?

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