• Video
  • 5 mins
  • Level 2: Intermediate

The Harm Principle: How to live your life the way you want to

Updated Tuesday 4th November 2014

This animation explains The Harm Principle argued by John Stuart Mill. 

When and where

Wednesday, 12th November 2014 12:04 - BBC Radio 4

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In his book On Liberty, John Stuart Mill argues for one simple principle: the Harm Principle. It amounts to this - The state, my neighbours, and everyone else should let me get on with my life as long as I don’t harm anyone in the process. Watch this animation to learn more.

 

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