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The Romantics: Track 1

Featuring: Audio Audio

How did Romantic writers address questions of identity? How did their experiences influence the way they expressed themselves? The Romantic period saw a rise in creative, artistic and intellectual pursuits in eighteenth century Europe. The era placed greater emphasis on emotion and intuition as opposed to the scientific rationalisation which had gained prominence during ‘The Age of Enlightenment’. In this audio selection, a panel of experts evaluate various elements of this movement and asses themes such as authorship, the idea of self in addition to the extent to which their work was affected by its historical context. This material forms part of The Open University course A230 Reading and studying literature.

By: The iTunes U team (Programme and web teams)

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Track 1: Romantic authorship

Professor Andrew Bennett discusses the idea of authorship.


© The Open University 2011


Tracks in this podcast:

Track   Title Description
1 Romantic authorship    Professor Andrew Bennett discusses the idea of authorship. Play now Romantic authorship
2 The self    How did Romantic writers represent ‘the self’? Play now The self
3 Wordsworth and De Quincy    Bill Greenwell adapts one of Wordsworth’s poems ‘To daffodils’ in the voice of Thomas De Quincy. Play now Wordsworth and De Quincy
4 Romantic timelines    What is the impact of writing in different literary periods? Play now Romantic timelines

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