Writing Poetry: Track 1

Featuring: Audio Audio

Poetry is a delicate and intricate art form, practised by many people but rarely mastered. In this album, poets Jackie Kay, Paul Muldoon, W.N. Herbert and Jean Breeze talk about their respective approaches and attitudes to poetry. They explore many aspects of their craft, from the initial spark of inspiration and rewriting to more technical matters such as rhyme, using real speech and narrative poetry. This material forms part of the course A175, Writing poetry.

By: The iTunes U team (Programme and web teams)

  • Duration 20 mins
  • Updated Sunday 31st May 2009
  • Introductory level
  • Posted under History & The Arts
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Track 1: The Purpose of Poetry

Poets Jackie Kay and W.N. Herbert talk about the importance and function of poetry, and read some of their own work to demonstrate their thoughts.


© The Open University 2009


Tracks in this podcast:

Track   Title Description
1 The Purpose of Poetry    Poets Jackie Kay and W.N. Herbert talk about the importance and function of poetry, and read some of their own work to demonstrate their thoughts. Play now The Purpose of Poetry
2 Getting Started    Joined by Paul Muldoon, the poets take a look at methods of being inspired, the purpose of meaning in poetry and the importance of reading contemporary poetry. Play now Getting Started
3 Personal Poetry    In this track, authors talk about the way in which their own lives inform and inspire their poetry, and the way in which personal details can be changed or highlighted in order to produce dramatic poetry. Play now Personal Poetry
4 Rhyme and Speech    Rhyme is an intrinsic aspect of poetry, but is it wholly necessary? Paul Muldoon and Jackie Kay talk to about where – and where not – to use rhyme, and the intrinsic rhythm patterns in everyday speech. Play now Rhyme and Speech

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