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Rissa de la Paz: Hello, and welcome to the Open2.net Weekend Break series. We’ll be helping you get the most of your European break by offering top tips and cultural insights into your destination. Along the way we’ll also suggest some key phrases to help you get by.

I’m Rissa de la Paz, and this time we’re looking at Germany. Joining me as a guide to both the country and the language is Ursula Lanvers. So Ursula, what sort of flavour of the country am I going to get on my weekend break?

Ursula Lanvers: Well hello Rissa. Of course, if you’re going for a short weekend break it’s not really enough to get the flavour of the whole country because there’s such an enormous diversity.

The custom and the culture and even the language differ quite a lot depending on where you are, in the North and the South and so on, and we have several big metropols; Berlin, Hamburg, Cologne, Frankfurt, Munich and so on.

So, Germany compared to other countries, France and this country as well, is actually much less centralised, and you would find therefore a lot of people take pride in the region they come from rather than just their national identity.

But you will find there’s one thing in common wherever you go in Germany, which is environmental awareness, they take that seriously, so you’ll find separate rubbish bins for all the rubbish everywhere.

Rissa de la Paz: So that’s interesting. One of the other things that strikes me is that the country as a whole has undergone significant change just over the past twenty years or so. I can still remember those images of the Berlin Wall falling, what sort of impact has that had on the Germany that I’m going to see today?

Ursula Lanvers: Oh, I think you can still see the signs of that today. Unification in Germany, of course, was in 1990, but you will visit today two different Germanys. For instance, the East has got higher unemployment and young people very often who live in the East travel to the West in order to find work.

And the infrastructure, although there has been a lot of work really, is not quite up to the standard, the high standard of the West. So it divides Germany a little bit, and some Westerners might resent paying a lot of taxes that go in the former East, and also Easterners sometimes feel a little bit nostalgic about their Communist past.

Rissa de la Paz: Interesting. But whether it’s the Eastern part or the Western part of Germany that I’ll visit, I just want to know how easy is it going to be for me to get by as far as language is concerned?

Ursula Lanvers: You’ll find pretty much the young generation speaks English, and they’re very enthusiastic about using it as well. But any effort you might make in speaking German would be much appreciated, so don’t be put off immediately if you get a perfect English reply.

Rissa de la Paz: That’s reassuring actually, because there is the danger of someone to speak English just to take the lazy way out, but we have no intention of doing that because we’re going to try and squeeze some basic phrases out of you so that we’ll be able to practice them when we go abroad.

Ursula Lanvers: Oh well done. Just a final tip; maybe Germans might seem a little brash at first when you go there, and it’s just a different attitude about the courtesy they use. Germans are friendly and very open so don’t be put off by first appearances.

Rissa de la Paz: Okay, so I’m going to try and be really brave and develop some phrases now, so let’s get down to basics. What sort of greetings can I have in mind?

Ursula Lanvers: Well, you can start with the most basic which is just saying hello, is ‘hallo’, and then you would say ‘guten Morgen’ if you meet somebody in the morning, and during the daytime ‘guten Tag’, and then after six o’clock in the evening you would say ‘guten Abend’ for good evening. And then another basic is to say thank you, ‘danke’, and to say goodbye you say ‘auf wiedersehen’.

Rissa de la Paz: Will it be the same sort of phrases that I’ll use to greet people no matter where I am in Germany?

Ursula Lanvers: Well again, there are regional variations. For instance, if you go to Bavaria or Austria, very often people would say ‘grüß Gott’, and if you go to Switzerland it will be ‘grüezi’. And the other thing to remember is that the handshake is practised a lot more than in this country, so you can practice that firm handshake before you go.

Rissa de la Paz: Okay.

Ursula Lanvers: And one thing you might already know is that the German language has the difference between the formal ‘Sie’ and the informal ‘du’, so ‘du’ would be used for children and also for people that you know very well, your family and so on, and in this little introduction we’re going to use ‘Sie’ because that’s the form you would use to address people you don’t know.

Rissa de la Paz: So basically the phrases that you’re going to be giving me are the ones that I’d use assuming I don’t know someone very well?

Ursula Lanvers: That’s right.

Rissa de la Paz: That’s great. But also now, assuming that, I’m sure that there will be situations where I’m going to be stuck for a phrase and I’m just going to need some help, so can you just tell me what sort of things that I might say?

Ursula Lanvers: Okay, well here’s some useful phrases. To say ‘excuse me’ you would say ‘Entschuldigung’, or if you want to know how to say something you’d say ‘wie sagt man …?’, or if you want somebody to repeat something, ‘Können Sie das wiederholen?’ If you want to know if they speak English, ‘Sprechen Sie Englisch?’ And then you might say you don’t understand, ‘Es tut mir Leid, ich verstehe nicht.’ And to say ‘I’m sorry’ is ‘Entschuldigung’.

Rissa de la Paz: I’m sure I’m going to need to bear those in mind but in fact we’ll be running through all these phrases again towards the end of the programme so anyone listening, they’ll be able to catch those phrases again.

But in the meantime, I suppose, my first opportunity to practice some of these phrases is when I’m actually, I’ve just arrived in the country and I need to find my way to my hotel. Just tell us a little bit about the sort of transport options that I’ve got available and how I’d go about finding them.

Ursula Lanvers: Well first you might want to simply ask how to get to somewhere so you would ask ‘Wie komme ich nach’ so und so and most likely thing is you’ll take a taxi so you ask where is the taxi stand and that is ‘Wo ist der Taxistand?’.

And then if you take a train or a bus, you need to buy a ticket and you would ask ‘Wo kann ich eine Fahrkarte kaufen?’ for where to buy your ticket. You might want to know how much it will cost, ‘Was kostet das?’ and also what time does it leave, the bus or the train, ‘Wann fährt der Zug ab?’ or ‘Wann fährt der Bus ab?’, and in case you have a train or bus you might need to change so you ask ‘Muß ich umsteigen?’ for do I have to change.

Rissa de la Paz: Is the public transport really fairly efficient? Tell us a bit about that.

Ursula Lanvers: Public transport is very good, is very reliable, there is a system of intercity trains which are very fast and usually work hourly. For those intercity trains you need a supplement which is called a ‘Zuschlag’, so beware of that if you have an intercity train otherwise you might need to pay extra.

You can book early and that allows you to get a much cheaper ticket, and generally the public transport is a lot cheaper than in this country. Also check out the fantastic offers that the ‘DieBahn’ offers for, for instance, weekend tickets or if you travel as a group you can have wonderful bargains.

Rissa de la Paz: So actually if I’m on my weekend break, there’s every likelihood that there’ll be a special weekend offer, weekend discount that I can take advantage of.

Ursula Lanvers: Oh yes.

Rissa de la Paz: I was interested when you mentioned the supplement, presumably right at the start when I state my destination they’ll tell me whether I need a supplement. How do I ask, ‘do I have to pay a supplement?’?

Ursula Lanvers: ‘Muß ich einen Zuschlag zahlen?’. The word is supplement, ‘Zuschlag’ to watch out for.

Rissa de la Paz: Well that’s great, armed with some of those useful phrases I feel confident that I’d be able to make my way quite happily to the hotel, either by taxi or public transport, but assuming I’ve got there and let’s assume I will have booked my hotel already, because I would like to probably have booked online, tell me what are the sort of things I can say when I’m checking in?

Ursula Lanvers: Well first you’d like to say perhaps that you’d like to check in, ‘Ich möchte gern einchecken’, that would be. To say that you reserved a room and what your name is, ‘Ich habe ein Zimmer reserviert, mein Name ist’ so and so, and then maybe you want to ask for your key, ‘Kann ich bitte den Schlüssel für Zimmer’ and then the number ‘haben’, so that’s the way to ask for your key.

Generally speaking, you might want to give a small tip for somebody to carry your bags up, but the amount depends totally on the kind of hotel that you go to. Now speaking of hotels, bear in mind the German youth hostels are actually of a very high standard and if you’re on a budget they’re a very good option, and they are actually for all ages, there’s no age restriction on it and you can have single rooms, double rooms, and so forth.

Rissa de la Paz: That’s great, do they offer family sized rooms as well, just as a matter of interest?

Ursula Lanvers: Oh, they do, they do, yes.

Rissa de la Paz: That’s definitely something worth remembering then. But what about sort of towards the end of my stay when I’m checking out, what sort of things can I say then?

Ursula Lanvers: Well you might want to know what time you need to check out because it’s different from hotel to hotel, and that would be ‘Wann soll ich auschecken?’ and then you might say you would like to check out, ‘Ich möchte gern auschecken’ and to ask for room service, that is ‘Zimmerservice’. And you might say you would like to pay, ‘Ich möchte gern zahlen’ and if you want to have a breakfast together with your overnight you would say, ‘Übernachtung mit Frühstück’.

Rissa de la Paz: So is breakfast normally included in the price of the room, how does that work?

Ursula Lanvers: Well you can ask for it separate but it’s a good idea to have it in the hotel, it’s a very good quality. And to ask what time the breakfast is, you would say ‘Wann gibt es Frühstück?’.

Rissa de la Paz: And if the hotel does offer a bed and breakfast, what’s the sort of thing that I’d see for me to know yes, they offer breakfast?

Ursula Lanvers: It would be ‘Übernachtung mit Frühstück’.

Rissa de la Paz: Great. So, I mean, it sounds like the breakfast is of great value there but I’m sure that’s just one of the many wonderful meals that we can sample while I’m on my weekend break. So maybe you can just start off by telling about the sort of things that one would typically have at breakfast in Germany.

Ursula Lanvers: Well breakfast is an important meal for Germans and there’s a lot of choice really. You can start off with a roll which is ‘Brötchen’ or if you’re in the south it might be called a ‘Semmel’, and then don’t be surprised to find a variety of toppings for that, so not just your jam, which is ‘Marmelade’, so Marmelade would be any flavour of jam, but you can also find savoury things like cheese and also sliced up meat and that’s called ‘Aufschnitt’, so that’s any kind of sliced meat that you would have on it. There’s a huge variety of rolls and I would advise you to try one because this country doesn’t offer the great variety, especially of the darker type of rolls, it’s a good opportunity to try something like that.

And, of course, you might have a boiled egg which is ‘ein gekochtes Ei’ and if it’s hard it would be ‘ein hartgekochtes Ei’, or soft, ‘ein weichgekochtes Ei’, and together with that you might have your coffee or your tea, so that would be ‘ein Kaffee’ and if you want it with milk, ‘mit Milch’, or your tea would be ‘ein Tee’ and again if you want it with milk, ‘mit Milch’. And you could have your cereal, but the choice of cereal is much reduced to this country.

Rissa de la Paz: Still, having said all that, whoever said that the continental breakfast was a soft option. I mean that sounds excellent, but assuming I’ll still have some sort of appetite around lunch time, what happens in terms of going out for meals around that time?

Ursula Lanvers: Well the first thing to say, there’s a huge choice of different eateries because the Germans are very fond of basically all foreign food. So, alongside with your traditional German restaurants you’d find Indian, Turkish, Italian and so on. You name it, it’ll be there. And one thing to remember, if you go into a café or restaurant, it doesn’t matter where, you would find table service so you don’t need to go to a counter and ask for your drink, they will come to you and serve you at the table.

And another thing to remember, if you go out for a meal you can usually just walk in and choose a table. It’s only if you dine very formally that perhaps you will be given a table, but normally you can just walk in and choose a table to sit.

Rissa de la Paz: Oh great, so I wouldn’t have to wait for someone to show me where to go.

Ursula Lanvers: No, only in very posh restaurants.

Rissa de la Paz: Great. Tell us a little bit about the sort of phrases that I might use if I wanted to order anything at all.

Ursula Lanvers: Well you might ask for the menu, that would be ‘Kann ich die Speisekarte haben bitte?’ and then you might ask about vegetarian options, ‘Welche vegetarischen Gerichte haben Sie?’. You bear in mind there are vegetarian options but it’s perhaps a bit reduced compared to this country. And to say ‘I would like’, ‘Ich hätte gern’, and then a couple of drinks: sparkling water, ‘Mineralwasser’ and still water is ‘ein stilles Mineralwasser’.

Rissa de la Paz: And at lunch time, for instance, are there sort of special offers during the day, a sort of fixed price menu? How does that work?

Ursula Lanvers: Well you would often find one main dish for lunch, which would be ‘ein Hauptgericht’ and if you were to go out in the evening for a bigger meal you might have a starter, a main course and dessert so the starter would be ‘die Vorspeise’ and then followed by ‘Hauptspeise’ and as a dessert you would ask for ‘Nachtisch’. And if you wanted to see the dessert menu, you would ask for ‘Dessertkarte’, ‘ich möchte die Desserkarte ansehen’.

Rissa de la Paz: But you say that in terms of vegetarian options, I can rely on finding some things even though it’s more reduced.

Ursula Lanvers: If you are really stuck then a good bet would be an Italian restaurant, they would always have some options but it is fairly good, yes.

Rissa de la Paz: I was interested in your telling me about the huge variety of other types of specialties of different nationalities but what about sort of more typical German dishes, what would be available?

Ursula Lanvers: There’s a huge variety but you might want to try the famous ‘Bratwurst’ which is just a grilled sausage and that Bratwurst can come with different types of sauces, and one would be the ‘Currywurst’ which is a grilled sausage with a curry sauce on it, and that goes very nicely with a potato salad, ‘Kartoffelsalat’, and you might also try out a pasta speciality with grated cheese on top which is famous in the South, and that is called ‘Spätzle’, that is very nice.

And you would also have heard about the different types of ‘Schnitzel’, which is basically a veal or pork slice which is coated in breadcrumbs and the Schnitzel, again, comes with different types of sauces. You can have it for instance with a mushroom sauce and that’s a ‘Jägerschnitzel’, a slightly spicy sauce which is called ‘Zigeunerschnitzel’, or you can have it just with lemon and that is a ‘Wiener Schnitzel’.

Rissa de la Paz: That’s useful to have you explain all that because I suspect if I were faced with that whole variety in the menu I wouldn’t be able to distinguish one from the other, so that’s great. But once it comes to paying and asking for the bill, what would I say?

Ursula Lanvers: Yes, in Germany you can ask for the bill to be paid separately or together if you are a group.

Rissa de la Paz: That’s very unusual, that can cause quite a stir when you do it in the UK, but that’s quite normal is it?

Ursula Lanvers: It is quite normal, yes indeed, and if you go out as, for instance, a group of students who all want to pay separately it is an advantage, absolutely, yes. And you would give a small tip, between 5% and 10% maybe, and if you pay in cash, for instance and you don’t want the change so you want them to keep that as a tip you can simply say ‘stimmt so’ and that would mean that they understand they keep the change.

Rissa de la Paz: Brilliant, but if I actually wanted to just say ‘I’d like to pay the bill now please’, how would I say that?

Ursula Lanvers: ‘Ich möchte gern zahlen’.

Rissa de la Paz: Okay. Well, of course, once I’ve worked off all that Wiener Schnitzel and the Currywurst, I suspect I might have some room for afternoon tea. Do they do afternoon tea in Germany?

Ursula Lanvers: Oh, it’s very important. Oh yes. Round about 3 o’clock or so, or 3.30, to have your ‘Kaffee und Kuchen’ is a German tradition, and there’s a huge choice of very tempting kind of cakes. You might go for a ‘Sachertorte’ if you indeed have a lot of space, and that is a very rich chocolate gateau which is, of course, a Vienna speciality.

Rissa de la Paz: Sounds just up my street.

Ursula Lanvers: Hmm, and equally rich and tempting is the Black Forest Gateau, which is ‘Schwarzwälderkirschtorte’ in German, but also very nice and my favourite is something called the ‘Bienenstich’, bee-sting literally, which is a cake which has got roasted almonds on top and the filling is custard in the middle.

Rissa de la Paz: Sounds delicious. So you would have coffee with that normally would you?

Ursula Lanvers: Yes, coffee or tea.

Rissa de la Paz: What about later on in the evening, if I want an aperitif and a drink of some sort, what sort of drinks could I try?

Ursula Lanvers: Oh well, I think it’s a must to try one of the famous German beers, because there’s such a huge choice really. There are many special beers and there are many regional beers, and people are normally proud of their regional beer, the ‘Kölsch’, the ‘Warsteiner’, the ‘Jever’ and so on.

And there are some beers which are completely unknown here; ‘Altbier’ is a quite dark beer and it has got a sweet taste, and together with the ‘Altbier’ you might have a little bit of raspberry syrup in the bottom and some fruit like strawberries in it, so that’s called ‘Altbierbowle’. And if you’re going for a lighter beer you might go for ‘Weizenbier’ which has got yeast in it, and again another light beer is the ‘Pils’, that has also got a slightly bitter taste to it.

And if you want to go for a slightly lighter drink, you might go for a wine which is mixed with sparkling water, and that is called ‘Gespritztes’. And, again, you might want to mix your beer with some shandy, and that is called ‘Alsterwasser’ if you go into the North of Germany, and it’s called ‘Radler’ in the South. So bear that in mind, two different words for shandy. And a nice thing to go with your beer is the famous ‘Pretzel’ which is, of course, a very very large one, about the size of a big roll, and has got the huge salt crystals on top, so that goes very nicely with your beer.

Rissa de la Paz: Assuming that with the pretzels on the one hand and all the beers on the other I’m still able to negotiate my way in a straight line and that I can do some sightseeing, just tell me about the sorts of things that I can look out for, and how I go about finding interesting things to see?

Ursula Lanvers: Well the first thing to say is that the city centres are generally all pedestrianised so it’s quite relaxing to just stroll around in there, so take in some sights while you’re just on foot. And another great way is to use the trams, because the big cities all have a tram system in addition to the underground system, so again that’s a nice relaxing way to just take in some sights of the city.

And in order to find out what to visit, you might need to ask for the tourist information, so you would ask ‘Wo ist die Touristeninformation?’ or ‘Wo ist der Verkehrsverein?’ and then if you’ve got a map with you and want somebody to show on the map you’d say ‘Zeigen Sie mir auf der Karte’.

And if you then find out where you want to go, you want to find out about opening times, closing times, what time does it open, ‘Wann öffnet es?’ and when does it close, ‘Wann schließt es?’ And you want to find out where to buy a ticket, ‘Wo kann ich eine Eintrittskarte kaufen?’, how much, ‘Was kostet das?’ and, of course, the all-important one, ‘where’s the toilet?’, ‘Wo ist die Toilette?’

Rissa de la Paz: Great, and what other sort of things would you suggest we do?

Ursula Lanvers: Well, I have one great tip to do if you happen to go to Berlin because the Reichstag has been completely revamped after unification, and you can get in for free to have a tour round, and you can go right up to the cupola at the very top, which allows you a fabulous view over the city. And it’s all free. But you might need to queue for about an hour or so.

Rissa de la Paz: Yes, what are the queues like, is there a system for queuing?

Ursula Lanvers: Sort of. It’s not really pushy but it’s not as orderly as in Britain I’m afraid.

Rissa de la Paz: Okay, so that’s one thing where we’re actually more orderly than the Germans. What about, now I’ve done my sightseeing and I’m ready for just sheer unadulterated shopping. Tell us a little bit about the sorts of things that I can look out for and any useful phrases as far as shopping’s concerned?

Ursula Lanvers: Ah well, the first thing to bear in mind is that shopping hours are a little bit more restricted. So, for instance, on a Sunday you would find a few shops closed, so do bear that in mind. Museums, however, all the big museums will still be open on a Sunday.

Generally speaking, especially if you’re in Berlin, I can recommend having a look around the second hand shops, because they’re just great fun and you can pick up some wonderful bargains there. And the attitude generally if you walk around in shops is quite laid back, you can just touch things and try on things and so on.

Rissa de la Paz: Great, so if I wanted to say, if someone came up to me and said can I help you, or whatever, and I want to say I’m just looking thanks, what sort of thing can I say?

Ursula Lanvers: Then you would say ‘Ich möchte mich nur umschauen’. But if you have then decided you want to buy something, you’d say ‘Ich möchte das kaufen’, and of course very often these days you’d just pay by card, so you’d ask ‘Do you take credit cards’, ‘Nehmen Sie Kreditkarten?’, ‘Where do I pay?’ you’d ask ‘Wo kann ich zahlen?’, and if you do need to find some cash you’d need to ask for a cashpoint, ‘Wo ist ein Geldautomat?’ And generally speaking, this is true really of all big European cities, just watch out for pickpockets because, of course, especially in the Kudamm area of Berlin, there are some around.

Rissa de la Paz: Okay, that’s a useful piece of advice, I’ll just make sure to have my valuables close by. But, if by any chance the worst did come to the worst and I lost something, what sort of thing can I say?

Ursula Lanvers: If you had lost, for instance, your credit card you would need to be able to say it, and it would be ‘Ich habe meine Kreditkarte verloren’, or likewise if it got stolen, ‘Man hat mir meine Kreditkarte gestolen’, or it could be the handbag, ‘Man hat mir meine Handtasche gestolen’. Hopefully it won’t come to that, but if your handbag did contain your passport, then you would need a replacement one to get back home, and then contact the British Embassy, and that’s ‘die Britische Botschaft’.

Rissa de la Paz: What about any health matters that might arise during my weekend break?

Ursula Lanvers: Well, the important thing to remember is that, of course, you are covered with the health insurance card, and if you take your health insurance card with you as you go on your travels you get free health cover in Germany.

Rissa de la Paz: That’s the European health insurance card isn’t it?

Ursula Lanvers: It is, yes, absolutely. And if you do need to have a doctor, for instance, or an ambulance, you would need to say it as well, ‘Ich brauche einen Arzt’ for a doctor, or for an ambulance, ‘Ich brauche einen Krankenwagen’. Or, say, if the worst comes to the worst, you need to phone the police, ‘Ich muß die Polizei anrufen’.

Rissa de la Paz: Hopefully we’re not going to have any emergencies like that, and actually the most serious emergency we’ll have to contend with will be either a serious hangover from all those beers, or indigestion from all those Pretzels and Kaffee and Kuchen.

Ursula Lanvers: That’s right, you would just go to a pharmacy really and ask for some tablets, and the pharmacy is ‘die Apotheke’.

Rissa de la Paz: ‘die Apotheke’, that’s great. But any final top tips or advice before we set off on our trip to Germany then?

Ursula Lanvers: Well, just enjoy it and have fun, and do try out the language, don’t be put off too much if you get a perfect English reply.

Rissa de la Paz: That’s great, thanks very much Ursula for joining me today, because that’s all we’ve got time for here on our weekend break to Germany. Bear some of our tips in mind and, as Ursula says, have a go at speaking the language, it will transform your whole stay.

Don’t forget, we’ve got other episodes in this series available in French, Spanish and Italian. You can get them all from Open2.net along with transcripts of the programmes. We’ll leave you with a list of key phrases that you’ve heard on the programme, together with others that you might find useful.

German Phrase book

Greetings

Hello — Hallo

Good morning — Guten Morgen

Good afternoon — Guten Tag

Good evening — Guten Abend

Thank you — Danke

Goodbye — Auf Wiedersehen

Excuse me — Entschuldigung

Survival phrases

I’m sorry — Es tut mir leid

Do you speak English? —Sprechen Sie Englisch?

How do I say…? — Wie sagt man….?

I’m sorry I don’t understand — Es tut mir leid, ich verstehe nicht.

Can you repeat that? — Können Sie das wiederholen?

Getting Around

How do I get to…? — Wie komme ich nach…?

Where is the taxi stand … —Wo ist der Taxistand ?

Where can I buy a ticket? — Wo kann ich eine Fahrkarte kaufen?

bus station — der Busbahnhof

train station — der Bahnhof

tube station — die U Bahn Station?

How much will it cost me? — Was kostet das?

How far is it? — Wie weit ist es?

What time does the train leave? — Wann fährt der Zug ab?

What time does the bus leave? — Wann fährt der Bus ab?

Which number bus goes to …? — Welche Busnummer fährt nach…?

Do I have to change? —Muß ich umsteigen?

Which stop should I get off at? — Wo muß ich aussteigen?

Do I have to pay a supplement? — Muß ich einen Zuschlag zahlen?
Which line goes to…? — Welche Linie fährt nach…?

Where is the nearest tube station? — Wo ist die nächste U-Bahn Station?

Hotels

I would like to check in. — Ich möchte gern einchecken.

I have reserved a room. My name is… — Ich habe ein Zimmer reserviert. Meine Name ist….

What time is breakfast — Wann gibt es Frühstück?

At what time should I check out? — Wann soll ich auschecken?

Can I have the key for room X please — Kann ich bitte den Schlüssel für Zimmer X haben?

I would like to check out. — Ich möchte gern auschecken.

Have you got a room for 1 night? — Haben Sie ein Zimmer für eine Nacht?

Have you got a room for 2/3 nights? — Haben Sie ein Zimmer für zwei Nächte/drei Nächte?

a single room — ein Einzelzimmer

a double room — ein Doppelzimmer

a family room — ein Familienzimmer

en suite room — Zimmer mit Bad

How much does it cost? — Was kostet das?

Room service — Zimmer service

I’d like to pay please. — Ich möchte gern zahlen.

Bed and breakfast — Übernachtung mit Frühstück

What time is breakfast please? — Wann gibt es Frühstück bitte?

Food and Drink

Breakfast items

roll — Brötchen

coffee with milk — Kaffee mit Milch

coffee without milk — Kaffee ohne Milch

tea with milk — Tee mit Milch

tea without milk — Tee ohne Milch

soft boiled egg — weich gekochtes Ei

hard boiled egg — hart gekochtes Ei

cooked sliced meat (like ham or, salami…) — Aufschnitt

cereals — Müsli

jam — Marmelade

Ordering and paying

Could I have the menu please? — Kann ich bitte die Speisekarte ansehen?

What vegetarian options do you have? — Welche vegetarischen Gerichte haben Sie?

I’d like … — Ich hätte gern…

sparkling water — Mineralwasser

still water — stilles Mineralwasser

I’d like to see the desert menu — Ich möchte die Dessertkarte sehen.

 

Thank you, that’s all. — Danke, das ist alles.

I’d like to pay please. — Ich möchte gern zahlen.

We’d like to pay together. — Wir möchten zusammen zahlen.

We’d like to pay separately. — Wir möchten getrennt zahlen.

starter — Vorspeise

main course — Hauptgericht

dessert — Nachtisch

Typical food

grilled sausage — Bratwurst

potato salad — Kartoffelsalat

grilled sausage with curry-sauce — Currywurst

fresh pasta, served with grated cheese —Spätzle

veal or pork slice, fried, coated in breadcrumbs — Schnitzel

Schnitzel with a slice of lemon — Wiener Schnitzel

Schnitzel with mushroom sauce — Jägerschnitzel

Schnitzel with a slightly spicy sauce with peppers — Zigeunerschnitzel

Typical drinks

a sweet dark beer — Altbier

a sweet dark beer with raspberry syrup and strawberries — Altbierbowle

a light beer with active yeast — Weizenbier

a light beer with a slightly bitter taste — Pils

white wine mixed with sparkling water — Gespritztes

shandy — Alsterwasser (in the North), Radler (in the South)

soft drink mixed with sparkling water — Schorle

Going out

Where is the tourist information office please? — Wo ist die Touristeninformation bitte?

city center — die Innenstadt

art gallery — die Kunstgalerie

cathedral — die Kathedrale/der Dom

market — der Markt

museum — das Museum

internet café — das InternetCafe

post box — der Briefkasten

cash machine — der Geldautomat

Can I get there on foot? — Kann ich das zu Fuß erreichen?

I am lost. — Ich habe mich verlaufen.

It’s about 15 minutes walk. — Es ist ungefähr eine Viertelstunde zu Fuß.

Go left at the next crossing. — Gehen Sie and der nächsten Kreuzung links.

Go right at the next crossing. — Gehen Sie and der nächsten Kreuzung rechts.

Go straight on. — Gehen Sie gradeaus.

Show me on the map. — Zeigen Sie mir auf der Karte.

Where are the toilets? Wo ist die Toilette?

sights — Sehenswürdigkeiten

guided city tour — Stadtführung

city bus tour — Stadtrundfahrt

Are there any guided tours? — Gibt es Führungen?

What time does it open? — Wann öffnet es?

What time does it close? — Wann schließt es?

Where do I buy a ticket? — Wo kann ich eine Eintrittskarte kaufen?

How much is it? — Was kostet das?

Where can I leave my coat? — Wo kann ich meinen Mantel lassen?

Where can I leave my bag? — Wo kann ich meine Tasche lassen?

Shopping

I’m looking for… — Ich suche…

I’m just browsing. — Ich will mich nur umschauen.

Could I have your help? — Können Sie mir helfen?

My shoe size is… — Meine Schuhgröße ist…

My dress size is… — Meine Kleidergröße ist…

Do you have this in a smaller size? — Haben Sie das in kleiner?

Do you have this in a bigger size? — Haben Sie das in größer?

Can I try this on? — Kann ich das anprobieren?

I’d like to buy this. — Ich möchte das kaufen.

Do you take credit cards? —Nehme Sie Kreditkarten?

Where do I pay? — Wo kann ich zahlen?

Emergencies

I’ve lost my wallet. — Ich habe meine Brieftasche verloren.

I’ve lost my credit cards. — Ich habe meine Kreditkarten verloren.

I’ve lost my passport. — Ich habe meinen Pass verloren.

I’ve lost my mobile. — Ich habe mein Handy verloren.

My credit card has been stolen. — Man hat mir meine Kreditkarte gestolen.

My bag has been stolen. — Man hat mir meine Tasche gestolen.

My handbag has been stolen. — Man hat mir meine Handtasche gestolen.

I need a doctor. — Ich brauche einen Arzt.

I need a an ambulance. — Ich brauche einen Krankenwagen.

I need to phone the police. — Ich muß die Polizei anrufen.

I need to contact the British Embassy. — Ich muß die Britischen Botschaft kontaktieren.

Pharmacy –die Apotheke

Rissa de la Paz: That’s it for the key phrases.

We hope you enjoyed Weekend Break and don’t forget you can get a transcript of this programme, and the rest of this series on open2.net.

I’m Rissa de la Paz and I was joined by Ursula Lanvers.

The programme was produced by Michael Brodbin and this is a BBC Worldwide production for The Open University.

Phrasebook

Here's a reminder of the key phrases from the programme.

Greetings

Hello — Hallo

Good morning — Guten Morgen

Good afternoon — Guten Tag

Good evening — Guten Abend

Thank you — Danke

Goodbye — Auf Wiedersehen

Excuse me — Entschuldigung

Survival phrases

I’m sorry — Es tut mir leid

Do you speak English? —Sprechen Sie Englisch?

How do I say…? — Wie sagt man….?

I’m sorry I don’t understand — Es tut mir leid, ich verstehe nicht.

Can you repeat that? — Können Sie das wiederholen?

Getting Around

How do I get to…? — Wie komme ich nach…?

Where is the taxi stand … —Wo ist der Taxistand ?

Where can I buy a ticket? — Wo kann ich eine Fahrkarte kaufen?

bus station — der Busbahnhof

train station — der Bahnhof

tube station — die U Bahn Station?

How much will it cost me? — Was kostet das?

How far is it? — Wie weit ist es?

What time does the train leave? — Wann fährt der Zug ab?

What time does the bus leave? — Wann fährt der Bus ab?

Which number bus goes to …? — Welche Busnummer fährt nach…?

Do I have to change? —Muß ich umsteigen?

Which stop should I get off at? — Wo muß ich aussteigen?

Do I have to pay a supplement? — Muß ich einen Zuschlag zahlen?
Which line goes to…? — Welche Linie fährt nach…?

Where is the nearest tube station? — Wo ist die nächste U-Bahn Station?

Hotels

I would like to check in. — Ich möchte gern einchecken.

I have reserved a room. My name is… — Ich habe ein Zimmer reserviert. Meine Name ist….

What time is breakfast — Wann gibt es Frühstück?

At what time should I check out? — Wann soll ich auschecken?

Can I have the key for room X please — Kann ich bitte den Schlüssel für Zimmer X haben?

I would like to check out. — Ich möchte gern auschecken.

Have you got a room for 1 night? — Haben Sie ein Zimmer für eine Nacht?

Have you got a room for 2/3 nights? — Haben Sie ein Zimmer für zwei Nächte/drei Nächte?

a single room — ein Einzelzimmer

a double room — ein Doppelzimmer

a family room — ein Familienzimmer

en suite room — Zimmer mit Bad

How much does it cost? — Was kostet das?

Room service — Zimmer service

I’d like to pay please. — Ich möchte gern zahlen.

Bed and breakfast — Übernachtung mit Frühstück

What time is breakfast please? — Wann gibt es Frühstück bitte?

Food and Drink

Breakfast items

roll — Brötchen

coffee with milk — Kaffee mit Milch

coffee without milk — Kaffee ohne Milch

tea with milk — Tee mit Milch

tea without milk — Tee ohne Milch

soft boiled egg — weich gekochtes Ei

hard boiled egg — hart gekochtes Ei

cooked sliced meat (like ham or, salami…) — Aufschnitt

cereals — Müsli

jam — Marmelade

Ordering and paying

Could I have the menu please? — Kann ich bitte die Speisekarte ansehen?

What vegetarian options do you have? — Welche vegetarischen Gerichte haben Sie?

I’d like … — Ich hätte gern…

sparkling water — Mineralwasser

still water — stilles Mineralwasser

I’d like to see the desert menu — Ich möchte die Dessertkarte sehen.

 

Thank you, that’s all. — Danke, das ist alles.

I’d like to pay please. — Ich möchte gern zahlen.

We’d like to pay together. — Wir möchten zusammen zahlen.

We’d like to pay separately. — Wir möchten getrennt zahlen.

starter — Vorspeise

main course — Hauptgericht

dessert — Nachtisch

Typical food

grilled sausage — Bratwurst

potato salad — Kartoffelsalat

grilled sausage with curry-sauce — Currywurst

fresh pasta, served with grated cheese —Spätzle

veal or pork slice, fried, coated in breadcrumbs — Schnitzel

Schnitzel with a slice of lemon — Wiener Schnitzel

Schnitzel with mushroom sauce — Jägerschnitzel

Schnitzel with a slightly spicy sauce with peppers — Zigeunerschnitzel

Typical drinks

a sweet dark beer — Altbier

a sweet dark beer with raspberry syrup and strawberries — Altbierbowle

a light beer with active yeast — Weizenbier

a light beer with a slightly bitter taste — Pils

white wine mixed with sparkling water — Gespritztes

shandy — Alsterwasser (in the North), Radler (in the South)

soft drink mixed with sparkling water — Schorle

Going out

Where is the tourist information office please? — Wo ist die Touristeninformation bitte?

city center — die Innenstadt

art gallery — die Kunstgalerie

cathedral — die Kathedrale/der Dom

market — der Markt

museum — das Museum

internet café — das InternetCafe

post box — der Briefkasten

cash machine — der Geldautomat

Can I get there on foot? — Kann ich das zu Fuß erreichen?

I am lost. — Ich habe mich verlaufen.

It’s about 15 minutes walk. — Es ist ungefähr eine Viertelstunde zu Fuß.

Go left at the next crossing. — Gehen Sie and der nächsten Kreuzung links.

Go right at the next crossing. — Gehen Sie and der nächsten Kreuzung rechts.

Go straight on. — Gehen Sie gradeaus.

Show me on the map. — Zeigen Sie mir auf der Karte.

Where are the toilets? Wo ist die Toilette?

sights — Sehenswürdigkeiten

guided city tour — Stadtführung

city bus tour — Stadtrundfahrt

Are there any guided tours? — Gibt es Führungen?

What time does it open? — Wann öffnet es?

What time does it close? — Wann schließt es?

Where do I buy a ticket? — Wo kann ich eine Eintrittskarte kaufen?

How much is it? — Was kostet das?

Where can I leave my coat? — Wo kann ich meinen Mantel lassen?

Where can I leave my bag? — Wo kann ich meine Tasche lassen?

Shopping

I’m looking for… — Ich suche…

I’m just browsing. — Ich will mich nur umschauen.

Could I have your help? — Können Sie mir helfen?

My shoe size is… — Meine Schuhgröße ist…

My dress size is… — Meine Kleidergröße ist…

Do you have this in a smaller size? — Haben Sie das in kleiner?

Do you have this in a bigger size? — Haben Sie das in größer?

Can I try this on? — Kann ich das anprobieren?

I’d like to buy this. — Ich möchte das kaufen.

Do you take credit cards? —Nehme Sie Kreditkarten?

Where do I pay? — Wo kann ich zahlen?

Emergencies

I’ve lost my wallet. — Ich habe meine Brieftasche verloren.

I’ve lost my credit cards. — Ich habe meine Kreditkarten verloren.

I’ve lost my passport. — Ich habe meinen Pass verloren.

I’ve lost my mobile. — Ich habe mein Handy verloren.

My credit card has been stolen. — Man hat mir meine Kreditkarte gestolen.

My bag has been stolen. — Man hat mir meine Tasche gestolen.

My handbag has been stolen. — Man hat mir meine Handtasche gestolen.

I need a doctor. — Ich brauche einen Arzt.

I need a an ambulance. — Ich brauche einen Krankenwagen.

I need to phone the police. — Ich muß die Polizei anrufen.

I need to contact the British Embassy. — Ich muß die Britischen Botschaft kontaktieren.

Pharmacy — die Apotheke