• Activity
  • 10 mins
  • Level 1: Introductory

Digital microscope

Updated Wednesday 13th May 2009

Want to get a closer look at the cells which make up our world, but don't have access to a microscope? We've got an answer for you – your very own digital microscope.

You need the Flash Player (version 7 or higher) to view this - download Flash. http://www2.open.ac.uk/openlearn/microscope/ms_engine.swf
 

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