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String of sausages lichen

Updated Monday 7th January 2013

Could this unusually named lichen be making a comeback?

A very unusual lichen features in this interview.

While the string of sausages lichen, Usnea articulata, is very noticeable in the countryside as it hangs from tree branches as long thin strands like uncombed and sparse straggly hair, its name comes from swellings that occur along the strands at intervals which give the appearance of sausages.

Having declined due to industrial pollution, this lichen is now being spotted more regularly in locations in south Wales and there are hopes its fortunes are improving as it spreads east.

Sam Bosanquet explains all to Saving Species' Brett Westwood.

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