• Activity
  • 10 mins
  • Level 1: Introductory

Be a coastal manager interactive

Updated Wednesday 6th February 2008

Have a go at managing your own piece of the coastline.

You need the Flash Player (version 7 or higher) to view this - download Flash. http://www2.open.ac.uk/openlearn/coast2007/manager/loader.swf
 

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