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Professor David Rothery image Copyrighted image Credit: Dave Rothery

Professor David Rothery

Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University

Professor David Rothery is a volcanologist and planetary scientist at The Open University, where he is Professor of Planetary Geosciences within the Department of Physical Sciences. Read more about Professor David Rothery

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Articles (41)

Browse all OpenLearn articles by Professor David Rothery

Fracking: No need for all the fuss

Fracking: No need for all the fuss Creative commons image Credit: By Joshua Doubek (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
Introductory Level Duration 10 mins Updated 20 Sep 2013
Geologist David Rothery considers the benefits of fracking against the environmental concerns.

Meteoric

Featuring: ActivityActivity
Meteoric Creative commons image Credit: The Open University
Introductory Level Duration 30 mins Updated 29 May 2013
Rocks hurtling through space shape the surface of the moons and planets as collide – and now you can use your skill and knowledge to make your own...

The rotating Moon

The rotating Moon Creative commons image Credit: NASA
Introductory Level Updated 14 Dec 2012
Find out more about the Moon’s state of synchronous rotation

Life on Mars

Life on Mars Copyrighted image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Introductory Level Updated 14 Dec 2012
What happens if we find evidence of life on Mars? 

Article Comments (52)

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A day on Mercury Copyrighted image Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Carnegie Institution of Washington/Brown University
Comment posted by bc3792 on 17th Apr 2014
Although it might seem unlikely, as Mercury is a rocky body so close to the Sun, it is not impossible in my reckoning. Mercury turns very slowly on its axis so although the day side of the planet...
Fracking: No need for all the fuss Creative commons image Credit: By Joshua Doubek (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
Comment posted by jt4278 on 10th Nov 2013
Sorry, meant to include the link to the New Brunswick, Canada, Fracking website where I obtained the quotes in used in my comment. http://nbfrackingresearch.com/
Fracking: No need for all the fuss Creative commons image Credit: By Joshua Doubek (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
Comment posted by jt4278 on 10th Nov 2013
A fracking project in British Columbia, Canada in 2010...Quote: "2010 Apache Oil proclaimed that it had completed the largest fracking job ever in the Horn River Basin (BC) ever – requiring 195...
Fracking: No need for all the fuss Creative commons image Credit: By Joshua Doubek (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
Comment posted by rm8287 on 9th Nov 2013
It's good to see some sensible discussion on fracking. Surely there are other issues though. I was under the impression that fracking required large quantities of water, something that is...
Fracking: No need for all the fuss Creative commons image Credit: By Joshua Doubek (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
Comment posted by cjm757 on 8th Nov 2013
Are you able to quantify the reduction in CO2 emissions if we were to replace all coal fired power with gas? Is there any reason why CCS could not be used on the gas fired power stations? I realise...

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OU on the BBC: Stargazing LIVE Series 3 Copyrighted image Credit: BBC
Comment posted by dar4 on 20th Jan 2012
Any condensed body with 4 million times the mass of the Sun could not sustain itself against collapse. There is no way it could have the same density as the Sun if its size (from other measurements...

More about Professor David Rothery

Professor David Rothery image Copyrighted image Credit: Dave Rothery

Academic advisor for:
Fracking: No need for all the fuss

Professor David Rothery is a volcanologist and planetary scientist at The Open University, where he is Professor of Planetary Geosciences within the Department of Physical Sciences. In 2006 he was appointed UK Lead Scientist on MIXS (Mercury Imaging X-ray Spectrometer) on the European Space Agency mission to Mercury (to be launched in 2016). His research interests centre on the study of volcanic activity by means of remote sensing, and volcanology and geoscience in general on other planets. Books include Planets: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press), Geology: The Key Ideas [Teach Yourself Geology] (Hodder Education), and Teach Yourself Volcanoes, Earthquakes and Tsunamis (Hodder Education).

Research:

David A. Rothery, Rebecca J. Thomas and Laura Kerber (2013) Prolonged eruptive history of a compound volcano on Mercury: volcanic and tectonic implications, In Earth and Planetary Science Letters N/A(385)

S. Z. Weider et al. (2012-01) The Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spectrometer: first results, In Planetary and Space Science 1(60)

S. Z. Weider et al. (2012-01) The Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spectrometer: First results, In Planetary and Space Science 1(60)

S. Narendranath et al. (2011-07) Lunar X-ray fluorescence observations by the Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spectrometer (C1XS): results from the nearside southern highlands, In Icarus 1(214)

Matthew R. Balme et al. (2011) Morphologies associated with small impact crater clusters in the Western Elysium Planitia region of Mars, In European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2011

David A. Rothery (2010-11) Planets: A Very Short Introduction, Oxford University Press

David A. Rothery and M. Massironi (2010-09) Beagle Rupes – evidence for a basal decollement of regional extent in Mercury's lithosphere, In Icarus 1(209)

David A. Rothery (2010-08-27) Geology: the Key Ideas (4th ed.), Hodder Headline

David A. Rothery et al. (2010) Mercury's surface and composition to be studied by BepiColombo, In Planetary and Space Science 1-2(58)

G. W. Fraser et al. (2010) The mercury imaging X-ray spectrometer (MIXS) on BepiColombo, In Planetary and Space Science 1-2(58)

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