Science, Maths & Technology
  • Audio
  • 5 mins
  • Level 1: Introductory

Photosynth

Updated Tuesday 24th March 2009

The Digital Planet team made use of Microsoft's experimental Photosynth service, which allows you to take a bunch of snapshots and turn them into something much more than the sum of the parts.

Copyright BBC

Want to know what it can do? Look at this collection of photos from Gareth's Flickr stream.

Now, look at what happens when those pictures are taken and photosynthed. [This is viewable through Silverlight - available for both the Mac and the PC; you may need to download and install the program on your computer.]

A grab from the Digital Planet Photosynth Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Production team

Want to try making your own Photosynths? You can do it with a pair of free programs. It only works on Windows XP and Vista, and you'll need to have a Windows Live ID. Download the Photosynth applications.

If you don't have a Windows PC, but do have an iPhone or an iPod Touch, you can create similar images with iSynth, which brings Photosynth to your mobile. Find out more about iSynth.

Find Out More

If digital photography is your thing, why not check out the Open University short course Digital photography: creating and sharing better images (delivered online and available worldwide).

 

For further information, take a look at our frequently asked questions which may give you the support you need.

Have a question?

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