Skip to content
Science, Maths & Technology
  • Video
  • 15 mins
  • Level 1: Introductory

Brits Who Built The Modern World: A video collection

Updated Wednesday 3rd May 2017

Collected extracts from the BBC/OU series exploring the titans of British architecture

Jump to:

Join us for a collection of the best bits of the BBC Four / Open University series The Brits Who Built The Modern World. We'll take you on a trip from Greenwich at the turn of the century, where the building which would become the O2 had a difficult birth; past the spy HQ on the bank of the Thames and 165 Park Road - the "Sardine Can" - through to Hampstead, and the elegant, singular home of Sir Michael Hopkins and Patricia Hopkins. We'll call by to visit Hong Kong, where tight space and rising demand called for a reinvention of the skyscraper. And we end up in 1960s America, where the cityscape resonates to this day.

The Millennium Dome

Hong Kong Skyscrapers

MI6 Headquarters

The Hopkins' home in Hampstead

The Sardine Can

The inspiration of 1960s America

 

For further information, take a look at our frequently asked questions which may give you the support you need.

Have a question?

Other content you may like

Methods in Motion: Occupying spaces in Hong Kong and London Creative commons image Icon Charlie Owen under Creative Commons BY-NC 4.0 license article icon

History & The Arts 

Methods in Motion: Occupying spaces in Hong Kong and London

Paul-Francois Tremlett explored the spaces the Occupy movement created - physical spaces, but also political spaces.

Article
How do empires work? free course icon Level 1 icon

History & The Arts 

How do empires work?

How are empires ruled? How do military, economic, logistic and cultural constructs combine to create 'systems of empire'? This free course, How do empires work?, introduces these questions by briefly sketching in the dramatic events of the Anglo-Chinese conflict over Hong Kong from 1839 to 1842.

Free course
1 hr
Health Check: Mental illness in Hong Kong Creative commons image Icon naiadsspring under CC-BY-ND under Creative-Commons license article icon

TV, Radio & Events 

Health Check: Mental illness in Hong Kong

This week Health Check explores the deep-rooted stigma of mental illness in Hong Kong

Article
Sir Norman (Lord) Foster Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Used with permission article icon

History & The Arts 

Sir Norman (Lord) Foster

Norman Foster approached design with a belief that workplaces could be better.

Article
Design for urban living: how we live and how we might live Creative commons image Icon The Open University under Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0 license article icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

Design for urban living: how we live and how we might live

In the UK there is a rush to build more homes. Is there a different way of making the houses we want to live in, that suits the ways we live in cities now?

Article
Why do some cities thrive? Creative commons image Icon Scorpions and Centaurs under Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0 license article icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

Why do some cities thrive?

Milton Keynes, home of The Open University, has grown successfully as a city - while other places have failed to thrive. New research is hoping to find out why.

Article
How can you use sand to store energy? Creative commons image Icon Łukasz Zabierowski under Creative Commons BY-SA 4.0 license article icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

How can you use sand to store energy?

A new project is attempting to bring together two things the desert has in abundance - sand and sunshine - to generate power cleanly and efficiently.

Article
Terminal Cities Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: BBC audio icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

Terminal Cities

Everyone wants to be able to go everywhere, but no-one wants the Terminal City near them. Simon Bell discusses the paradox of modern air travel.

Audio
10 mins
Deco - a style? Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Used with permission article icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

Deco - a style?

Tim Benton, explains art deco, which, he says, lurks below the surface of all the arts in the 1920s and 1930s, like original sin. "It emerged wherever, in poverty or wealth, people decided they wanted to have fun."

Article