Science, Maths & Technology
  • Video
  • 5 mins
  • Level 1: Introductory

What is inclusive design and how are Microsoft using it to make the XBox better?

Updated Wednesday 15th February 2017

In this short video, Microsoft's XBox team explain how they used inclusive design to improve everyone's social gaming experience.

"It's really just about a design process that meets everybody's needs..." Inclusive design is a step beyond taking a design and making it accessible - as the XBox team explain, it's about rethinking how you design altogether.

Full transcipt - and much more on Microsoft's approach to inclusive design, including a set of toolkits to help shape your design approach - is available at the Microsoft inclusive Design website.

 

For further information, take a look at our frequently asked questions which may give you the support you need.

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