Skip to content

Design

Free CourseFree Course

This free course looks at the process of design, from assessing the complexity of design as an activity to exposing the difficulty in making general conclusions about how designers work. You will be able to identify innovation in a wide variety of designed objects and evaluate the impact of this innovation.

Having studied this unit you should be able to:

  • recognise that functional artefacts have had input from a designer, with greater and lesser degrees of engineering input.
  • identify that engineering designers work within constraints of finance, materials properties, desired functionality, human factors, etc.;
  • understand that design exploits models of the product being designed, whether those models are physical mock-ups, computer-based models, or mathematical models which explore an element of the product’s performance;
  • understand that there is rarely a unique solution to any design problem. Part of the skill of a designer is in finding a problem–solution pair, and the best compromise;
  • understand how models of the design process are formulated, and how they can be applied to understand the development of a particular product or product family;
  • understand that models of the design process, while useful, cannot guarantee good design or provide a template by which all designs can be judged;
  • understand that early choices about design can have large influences on the available final solutions.
  • appreciate the steps required to move from a conceptual design to a functional product within a process of innovation;
  • critically evaluate the success of a designed product, and suggest concepts for improvement where necessary;
  • understand design-related terminology such as innovation, context, uncertainty and style;
  • understand the concept of stiffness, and that the stiffness of a component can be altered by changing its dimensions or changing the material from which it is made;
  • understand the concept of stress, and how it can be calculated simply from the force and the cross-sectional area;
  • understand the concept of strain, and how to calculate it;
  • understand the concept of Young’s modulus and how to calculate it. Be able to distinguish between Young’s modulus as a material’s property and stiffness as a component property;
  • understand the principle of a merit index for comparing different materials, and be able to perform simple calculations of merit indices.

By: The Open University

  • Duration 28 hours
  • Updated Tuesday 10th December 2013
  • Introductory level
  • Posted under Design
Share on Google Plus Share on LinkedIn Share on Reddit View article Comments
Print
Help with Search this document
Skip to main content

Contents

Study this free course

Enrol to access the full course, get recognition for the skills you learn, track your progress and on completion gain a statement of participation to demonstrate your learning to others. Make your learning visible!

Design

Learning outcomes

Unit image

Having studied this unit you should be able to:

  • recognise that functional artefacts have had input from a designer, with greater and lesser degrees of engineering input.

  • identify that engineering designers work within constraints of finance, materials properties, desired functionality, human factors, etc.;

  • understand that design exploits models of the product being designed, whether those models are physical mock-ups, computer-based models, or mathematical models which explore an element of the product’s performance;

  • understand that there is rarely a unique solution to any design problem. Part of the skill of a designer is in finding a problem–solution pair, and the best compromise;

  • understand how models of the design process are formulated, and how they can be applied to understand the development of a particular product or product family;

  • understand that models of the design process, while useful, cannot guarantee good design or provide a template by which all designs can be judged;

  • understand that early choices about design can have large influences on the available final solutions.

  • appreciate the steps required to move from a conceptual design to a functional product within a process of innovation;

  • critically evaluate the success of a designed product, and suggest concepts for improvement where necessary;

  • understand design-related terminology such as innovation, context, uncertainty and style;

  • understand the concept of stiffness, and that the stiffness of a component can be altered by changing its dimensions or changing the material from which it is made;

  • understand the concept of stress, and how it can be calculated simply from the force and the cross-sectional area;

  • understand the concept of strain, and how to calculate it;

  • understand the concept of Young’s modulus and how to calculate it. Be able to distinguish between Young’s modulus as a material’s property and stiffness as a component property;

  • understand the principle of a merit index for comparing different materials, and be able to perform simple calculations of merit indices.

Tags, Ratings and Social Bookmarking

Ratings

No votes yet

Share

T173_1