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Open Mathematics: Track 1

Featuring: Video Video Audio Audio

The Severn Valley Railway is one of Britain's best known steam railways. Over much of its length, there is only a single track, with passing points at various points along the line. As with any commercial rail operation, the timetable needs to meet passenger needs and health and safety requirements. The five video tracks in this album follow the work of railway employees as they monitor and develop the service to suit passenger demand and ensure safety systems are in place. The material forms part of the course MU120 Open Mathematics.

By: The iTunes U team (Programme and web teams)

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Track 1: Open Mathematics

A short introduction to this album.


© The Open University 2008


Tracks in this podcast:

Track   Title Description
1 Open Mathematics    A short introduction to this album. Play now Open Mathematics
2 Running Trains Safely    Steam trains in the valley of the River Severn - ensuring the train service meets customer demand and ensures safety. Play now Running Trains Safely
3 Journeys as Graphs    The timetable in action and the practical challenges a timetabler faces. Representing a journey as a position-time graph. Play now Journeys as Graphs
4 Synchronising Crossing Times    How to keep numerous trains on schedule. Analysing the timetable and synchronising cross over points. Play now Synchronising Crossing Times
5 Additional Safety Measures    Track tokens and train safety. Creating gaps for special excursions within the regular timetable. Play now Additional Safety Measures
6 Making Timetables from Graphs    Creating a timetable and identifying extra slots on an existing timetable for a more frequent service. Play now Making Timetables from Graphs

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