Sounds harmonious: Track 1

Featuring: Video Video Audio Audio

Math can be applied to pretty much everything in existence, and music is of no exception. Across this album, The Open University's Alan Graham shares his wealth of knowledge on the relationship between music and math, demonstrates many easy-to-follow theories and examples, and performs several pieces of traditional music with his band Betty's Kitchen. This material forms part of The Open University course MU120 Open mathematics.

By: The iTunes U team (Programme and web teams)

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Track 1: Sounds harmonious

As per album description


© The Open University 2009


Tracks in this podcast:

Track   Title Description
1 Sounds harmonious    As per album description Play now Sounds harmonious
2 Music and math    The Open University's Alan Graham shares his knowledge on the link between music and math, and his band Betty's Kitchen perform several songs and talk us through their instruments. Play now Music and math
3 Pitch and time    This track looks at the relationship between pitch and time in musical notation and illustrates how vibrations produce musical notes and how pitch is determined. Play now Pitch and time
4 Musical frequencies    This track shows us how tuning forks produce sine waves and uses the oscilloscope to demonstrate how different instruments produce different sine waves. Play now Musical frequencies
5 Sine curves    Alan Graham, of The Open University, explains the mathematical origin of sine curves and also uses a bodhrán (Irish frame drum) for an example. Play now Sine curves
6 Octaves and scales    This track explores the relationships between notes and scales on a keyboard through the use of three popular scales. Play now Octaves and scales
7 Rhythmic patterns    Alan Graham of The Open University explains how he used a simple mathematical diagram to play a musical rhythm of 3/2, and demonstrates the beat on the bongos. Play now Rhythmic patterns

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