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Genetic revolutions: Track 1

Featuring: Audio Audio

How have discoveries in modern genetics vindicated Darwin's theories? Does the study of DNA reveal the process of evolution? And how is the modern science of genetics evolving? In this album, Sean Carroll, Professor of Molecular Biology and Genetics at the University of Wisconsin, reveals how discoveries in contemporary genetics both endorse Darwin's theory of evolution and enable scientists to mount complex investigations into the development of humankind and many other species. He discusses the genetic similarities between many different forms of life and looks forward to further advances in the future. The tracks on this album were produced by The Open University in collaboration with the British Council. They form part of Darwin Now, a global initiative celebrating the life and work of Charles Darwin and the impact his ideas about evolution continue to have on today’s world. © The British Council 2009.

By: The iTunes U team (Programme and web teams)

  • Duration 25 mins
  • Updated Thursday 1st April 2010
  • Introductory level
  • Posted under Across the Sciences
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Track 1: Genetic revolutions

A brief introduction to this album.


© The Open University


Tracks in this podcast:

Track   Title Description
1 Genetic revolutions    A brief introduction to this album. Play now Genetic revolutions
2 Genetics and Darwin    Does the modern science of genetics confirm or contradict Darwin's approach to evolution? Sean Carroll reveals how the structure of DNA gives today's scientists new insights into species development. Play now Genetics and Darwin
3 Fossil genes    Certain genes are found in DNA sequences which are no longer in use. These are an important tool to help us understand the evolution of particular organisms. Play now Fossil genes
4 Evolution and repetition    Studying the DNA record reveals how certain adaptations are repeated in different species that find themselves facing similar challenges. Play now Evolution and repetition
5 Bodybuilding genes    Certain genes that play a crucial role in the evolution of complex structures, such as the eye, turn out to be common to many different species. Play now Bodybuilding genes
6 How DNA can reveal human evolution    DNA studies allow scientists to compare human evolution with that of chimpanzees, and most fascinatingly, the evolution of Neanderthals. Play now How DNA can reveal human evolution

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