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Science, Maths & Technology
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  • 30 mins
  • Level 1: Introductory

Meteoric

Updated Wednesday 29th May 2013

Rocks hurtling through space shape the surface of the moons and planets as collide – and now you can use your skill and knowledge to make your own mark. Can you cover a target percentage of a planet or a moon’s surface with impact craters – by choosing meteroids based on size, make-up and speed and aiming them at your chosen target.

Are you ready to start the challenge? Select the image below to begin.

Meteoric game image 1100 730 How much can you crater? 1100 730

Tip: If you get stuck, take a look at the helpful tutorial, which can be accessed from the game homepage.

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