Science, Maths & Technology

Kathy's Carriacou diary: Arrival

Updated Monday 28th January 2008

Kathy Sykes's diary of arriving as a castaway, from the BBC/OU series Rough Science 2

Arrival

Feeling SPACED.

Was up at 3.30am this morning and on the journey I took every opportunity to finish stuff off - writing letters, last minute shopping at Gatwick and phone calls - almost up until take-off. Great to meet the others at Gatwick - Kate organising all of us bleary-eyed-looking people.

Barbados Airport - crazy. Took hours to get stuff taken care of and 'taken care of' meant leaving half behind. The plane was too small to fit us and the kit.

Landing on Carriacou was very special. Sandra, Steve, David and Sarah waiting with us as plane flew in. Quite humid and mellow atmosphere.

First day of filming

Fab breakfast of bacon and eggs while overlooking the turquoise sea with sun streaming in sideways - with splodges of warm light. Feels like a good start!

The filming location is AMAZING! It looks and feels glorious - palms and beach by open valley with donkeys munching and braying. Disused lime works (like the fruit - not like the salt from sea shells). Mad old building stuffed full of delights. Including bats.

Trunkfuls of amazing gear including incredibly strong magnets, mirrors, glassware, sieves, saws, clamps, wire of various gauges and even glass tubes! Very exciting. Must be more stuff we'll need but I'm thrilled in what we have.

But damn hot! Sweating all day like crazy. Dripping and dirty and delighted. Is Mike L going to drive Ellen crazy by talking about eating bats and lizards? Maybe, but it'll make for some funny shots on the way.

Some very hot bits walking behind Kate. Piece to camera had to be perfectly synchronised. Not so easy. But stomping back and forwards in baking sun overlooking palm fringed beach ain't so bad.

Finished day with jog on beach.

 

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