OU on the BBC: Cell City

Updated Friday 17th May 2002

From the huge to the microscopic - exploring cells from a city perspective.

All living beings are made up of tiny microscopic units called cells. While towns and cities vary greatly in size, no matter where they are in the world, they share many similar features. Likewise, despite the vast variety of life forms and cell types, different shapes and sizes, all cells have many features in common.

Travel from outer space on a journey of discovery, into the depths of a single cell.

 

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