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OU on the BBC: Coast

Updated Friday 23rd July 2010

The always-surprising story of life on the edge of the British Isles - and beyond - is a co-production between the BBC and The Open University.

The series that has become an institution returns for a fifth collection of stories from around the edges of the land.

Embarking on their most ambitious voyage ever the team venture far out across the water, in Demark they sail in the Longships that helped the Vikings conquer Britain and also discover what makes the Danes the happiest people on earth.

In Brittany the adventure takes us to the 'End of the Earth', where on a tiny island of heroes veterans of the Free French forces relive one of the most extraordinary episodes of the Second World War.

Closer to home there's a brand new tour around the British Isles, climb the stunning sea cliffs of Ireland's Atlantic west coast, experience the mysterious 'Singing Sands' of Wales, take a boat journey coast to coast on a mighty waterway cut through the heart of the Scottish Highlands, and ride on a steam train to the exhilarating English Riviera.

This is all new Coast... and Beyond!

 

For further information, take a look at our frequently asked questions which may give you the support you need.

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