OU on the BBC: Darwin and evolution

Updated Wednesday 3rd September 2008

Celebrating the 200th anniversary of Charles Darwin's birth - and considering his work.

Darwin as depicted in the 30th September 1871 edition of Vanity Fair Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: photos.com

In 2009, The Open University and the BBC will be joining forces to mark the 200th anniversary of the birth of Charles Darwin and the 150th anniversary of the publication On The Origin Of Species.

Darwin and evolution in more depth:

 

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