OU on the BBC: Justice: Amnesty! When They Are All Free

Updated Tuesday 31st May 2011

Marking the 50th anniversary of the campaigning group, Storyville presents a history of Amnesty International.

Amnesty! When They Are All Free takes an unprecedented look into the world of Amnesty International as it approaches its fiftieth anniversary.

The Amnesty logo made out of burning candles Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Amnesty International

From its beginnings as a letter writing campaign to help stop international violations of human rights, Amnesty International has become one of the most powerful non-governmental organisations in the world.

With many famous supporters, and some huge successes in highlighting abuses and imprisonments of some of the worlds most heroic icons, Amnesty International continues to battle for people around the world.

Following the new Secretary General, Salil Shetty, the film exposes the daily struggles within the organisation to help as many people worldwide as possible.

The staff at Amnesty have to tackle such disparate needs as homophobia in Uganda to the revolution in Egypt. Combining these present day issues with interviews and archive footage, Amnesty! When They Are Free gives the wider picture on how the organisation has changed the world for the better while leaving the lingering question: to what extent can organisations like Amnesty be effective in tackling human rights abuses?

The history of the Amnesty logo

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