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OU on the BBC: Mark Steel Lectures - Darwin

Updated Thursday 21st October 2004

Find out more about Charles Darwin in this programme from the BBC/OU Mark Steel Lectures.

Darwin Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Used with permission

Delving further, and more imaginatively, into the evolution of Charles Darwin than ever before, the Mark Steel Lecture takes this modern hero off the ten pound note and into the present day. We follow him onto the Beagle and into the bedroom, and worry for his sanity as he fashions a turtle out of mashed potato.

A tortured figure whose distress eventually forced him to take to his bed and watch Animal Hospital and Countdown all day (probably), this is the show that tells you things about Darwin you never knew - including his opinion on the taste of Galapagos tortoise urine.

Featuring Martin Hyder as Charles Darwin and - in one of his final TV appearances - the late Bob Monkhouse as himself.

First broadcast: Tuesday 7 Oct 2003 on BBC Four

 

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