OU on the BBC: People's War - Taking It Further - Courses

Updated Friday 11th February 2005

Want to go deeper into the issues and history of the Second World War and social history? Why not sample the range of further study available through the Open University courses?

This family - pictured in 1947 - show typical home life in the war period Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Used with permission

If you want to know more about the history of the Second World War, or about investigating history, why not try an Open University course?

Introduction to the Humanities (A103) – An introductory course for the Arts subjects – looking at paintings and architecture, listening to music, reading poetry, drama and a novel, and discussing philosophy, religion and learning how to evaluate sources of evidence from history.

Start Writing Family History (A173) – This short online course helps you interpret and write about your family history. It includes sections on interpreting and evaluating photographs.

If you're interested in this course, you can try an online Writing Family History sample.

An Introduction to the Social Sciences: Understanding Social Change (DD100) – An introductory course for the Social Sciences. This builds on what you already know to tackle big issues in the contemporary world, such as changes in family, work and identity, risk and the environment and the impact of globalisation.

Europe: Culture and Identities In A Contested Continent (AA300) – This interdisciplinary course examines the complex nature of identities in contemporary Europe, asking how European identities are embodied and expressed in cultural artefacts. These themesare examined with reference to a wide range of cultural artefacts that include drama, poetry, film and architecture.

Total War and Social Change: Europe 1914-1955 (AA312) – Another advanced (third level) course that looks at the relationship between war and the transformation of society in the first half of the twentieth century. This includes sections on women and war, as well as film and propaganda.

Culture, Media and Identities (D318) – An advanced (third level) course that explores media and cultural studies. This includes a look at the way new technologies affect everyday life and popular culture, as well as analysing media messages and images.

Beginning to Study

If you have no experience of higher education, deciding to become an undergraduate student can be a big step. Our ‘Openings’ programme of short introductory courses has been specifically designed to give you the chance to test the water before committing yourself. Short courses, such as Start Writing Family History (described above), are for people who may already have study experience, but who don’t want to commit to a full undergraduate course straight away.

People's War in more depth:

 

For further information, take a look at our frequently asked questions which may give you the support you need.

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