Skip to content
Health, Sports & Psychology

OU on the BBC: Trust Me, I'm A Doctor - Superfoods

Updated Monday 20th October 2014

Can foods be as potent as medicines? The second episode of Trust Me, I'm a Doctor investigates the truth about superfoods.

Michael Mosley moulded bread Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: BBC There seems to be no end to the spectacular health claims made for fruit and vegetables but do they stand up to scrutiny. Dr Chris van Tulleken investigates three so called superfoods – garlic, beetroot and watermelon which have all been reported to lower blood pressure, but do they?

To find out, Trust Me, I’m A Doctor enlisted the help of the Cardiff Arms Park Male Choir. Some of the members had a blood pressure reading that was higher than ideal. We wanted to see if adding these foods to the choir’s diet could lower their blood pressure. Even just a small drop can significantly cut the risk of heart attacks and strokes. The results, in just three weeks were surprising.

Also in the programme, medical journalist Michael Mosley quizzes leading experts to discover if a headline such as ‘sugar is toxic’ has any basis in fact. He also investigates the truth about sell by dates. Is it ever safe to just cut off the mould and eat what’s left? 

There’s something that most of us have in our kitchen that’s great for treating a burn but would you know what it is?  Dr Saleyha Ahsan gives first aid tips on how to treat a severe burn while also dispelling a few myths. 

Surgeon Gabriel Weston travels to Krasnodar in Russia to see the work of a pioneering but controversial surgeon. He’s using stem cells to replace a patient’s damaged windpipe – a process called ‘regenerative medicine’, but it’s an area of science where experts disagree on the merits of using stem cells and where some believe the risks outweigh the benefits.

Watch Trust Me, I'm a Doctor on BBC Two

You can watch this episode on Wednesday 22 October at 8:00pm on BBC Two. More information, details of broadcast and links to watch online when available can be found on the BBC website.

 

For further information, take a look at our frequently asked questions which may give you the support you need.

Have a question?