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The hidden history of learning disability: Track 1

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How important is oral history in understanding the life of people with learning disabilities? This audio, recorded in July 2009 at the Social History of Learning Disability Conference at The Open University, features people with learning disabilities sharing their experiences first-hand with historians and social researchers on equal terms. The significance of capturing real-life stories through oral history is described by one academic contributor as a way of showing people ‘not as victims but as survivors’, while for another it ‘opens your eyes to corners of social life’. Featuring Professor Dorothy Atkinson of The Open University based Learning Disability History Research Group.

By: The OpenLearn team (The Open University,)

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Track 1: The hidden history of learning disability

A collection of stories and interviews with academics and people with learning disabilities, recorded at the Social History of Learning Disability Conference in July 2009, led by The Open University's Professor Dorothy Atkinson.


© The Open University 2009


Tracks in this podcast:

Track   Title Description
1 The hidden history of learning disability    A collection of stories and interviews with academics and people with learning disabilities, recorded at the Social History of Learning Disability Conference in July 2009, led by The Open University's Professor Dorothy Atkinson. Play now The hidden history of learning disability

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