Postgraduate study skills in science, technology or mathematics
Postgraduate study skills in science, technology or mathematics

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Postgraduate study skills in science, technology or mathematics

References

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Fiske, J. (1993) Introduction to Communication Theory, London and New York, Routledge.
Fuller, S. (1997) Science, Buckingham, Open University Press.
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Holliman, R. (2004) ‘Media coverage of cloning: a study of media content, production and reception’, Public Understanding of Science, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 107–30. Available from http://pus.sagepub.com.libezproxy.open.ac.uk/ cgi/ content/ abstract/ 13/ 2/ 107
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Medawar, P. (1999) ‘Is the scientific paper a fraud?’, in Scanlon, E. Hill, R. and Junker, K. (eds) Communicating Science: Professional Contexts, London, Routledge.
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