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Social psychology and politics
Social psychology and politics

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5.2 Consolidation quiz

Before you go on to the next section, check your understanding of some key concepts that have been covered here.

Activity 9 Consolidation quiz

As you saw in the interview extract in the previous section, Mark Burton and his colleagues have come up with six key principles for liberation psychology. Below, you will see the six principles and an example or definition for each one. Match each principle with its correct definition.

Using the following two lists, match each numbered item with the correct letter.

  1. Social problems are generated through social processes

  2. Prioritises work with the poor, the vulnerable and the marginalised

  3. Consciousness raising

  4. Being critical of the ways in which ‘problems’ are presented to us

  5. Developing theory from practice and experience

  6. Using more ‘creative’ approaches, e.g. drama, photo, voice etc.

  • a.Understanding social justice and the social system

  • b.Going beyond appearance and questioning ideology

  • c.Understanding the perspective of people who are in oppressed social systems

  • d.Becoming aware of social forces and relations that affect people

  • e.Taking a stance on theory; not being theory led

  • f.Taking an eclectic approach to method

The correct answers are:
  • 1 = a
  • 2 = c
  • 3 = d
  • 4 = b
  • 5 = e
  • 6 = f

Discussion

Principle Definition
Understanding social justice and the social system Social problems are generated through social processes
Understanding the perspective of people who are in oppressed social systems Prioritises work with the poor, the vulnerable and the marginalised
Becoming aware of social forces and relations that affect people Consciousness raising
Going beyond appearance and questioning ideology Being critical of the ways in which ‘problems’ are presented to us
Taking a stance on theory; not being theory led Developing theory from practice and experience
Taking an eclectic approach to method Using more ‘creative’ approaches, e.g. drama, photo, voice etc.