Robert Owen and New Lanark
Robert Owen and New Lanark

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Robert Owen and New Lanark

Acknowledgements

This course was written by Dr Emma Barker.

This free course is an adapted extract from the course A207 From Enlightenment to Romanticism c. 1780–1830, which is currently out of presentation

The material acknowledged below is Proprietary (not subject to Creative Commons licence) and used under licence. No alteration or manipulation of images is permitted and they must be used in context and for non commercial purposes.

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this course:

Course image: Kelly Short [Tip: hold Ctrl and click a link to open it in a new tab. (Hide tip)] in Flickr made available under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence.

Figure 1 Robert Owen, c. 1799, by Mary Knight, Scottish National Portrait Gallery, Scotland. This image may not be subjected to any form of reproduction including transmission, performance, display, rental, or storage in any retrieval system without the written consent of National Galleries of Scotland. Downloading of this image is strictly for private study only.

Figure 2 David Dale, 1791, by James Tassie, National Portrait Gallery, Scotland. This image may not be subjected to any form of reproduction including transmission, performance, display, rental, or storage in any retrieval system without the written consent of National Galleries of Scotland. Downloading of this image is strictly for private study only.

Figure 3 New Lanark, c. 1799, engraving of National Monuments of Scotland by Robert Scott; Crown Copyright: RCAHMS.

Figure 4 Pollard and Kennedy Mills, Ancoats Lane, Manchester, c. 1830, by Thomas Slack. Chethams Library Manchester.

Figure 5 View of Boniton Lin by Paul Sandby. Donnachie-Owen Collection.

Figure 6 A monitorial school in operation from Paul Monroe. A Cyclopedia of Education, New York, Macmillan, 1913.

Figure 7 Frontispiece of A Statement Regarding the New Lanark Establishment, 1812, Donnachie-Owen Collection.

Figure 8 The agricultural workhouse at Veenhuisen, 1828. The British Library.

Figure 9 Ticket for wages. Donnachie-Owen Collection.

Figure 10 Design for a Community, Stedman Whitwell, c.1825. From Harrison, 1969, Plate 16, opp. p. 116.

The essays sourced below appear in: From Enlightenment to Romanticism: Anthology II (eds Carmen Lavin and Ian Donnachie). Published by Manchester University Press in association with The Open University, 2004. This publication forms part of an Open University course A207 From Enlightenment to Romanticism, c. 1780–1830.

Source: R. Owen (1816), A New View of Society and Other Writings, with an introduction by John Butt, Dent, London, 1972, pages 14–90. Based on the edition of 1837, the essays were edited by Alison Hiley for the Anthology above.

The video extracts are taken from A207 From enlightenment to romanticism, c. 1780–1830. Produced by the BBC on behalf of the Open University © The Open University.

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