Health, disease and society: Scottish influence in the 19th century
Health, disease and society: Scottish influence in the 19th century

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Health, disease and society: Scottish influence in the 19th century

Acknowledgements

This course was written by Dr Debbie Brunton.

This free course is an adapted extract from the course A218 Medicine and Society in Europe, 1500–1930, which is currently out of presentation

The material acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions [Tip: hold Ctrl and click a link to open it in a new tab. (Hide tip)] ) and is used under licence.

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission:

Course image: Wellcome Images in Wikimedia made available under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Licence.

The extracts adapted for OpenLearn appear in full in Medicine Transformed: Health, Disease and Society in Europe 1800–1930 (ed Deborah Brunton), published by Manchester University Press in association with the Open University (2004). This book formed part of the course material for Open University course A218 Medicine and society in Europe 1500–1930.

Chapter 4: ‘The rise of laboratory medicine’; Chapter 5: ‘The emergence of a modern profession’ (Deborah Brunton); Chapter 6: ‘Women in medicine: doctors and nurses, 1850–1920’ (Maxine Rhodes); Chapter 11: ‘The rise of the asylum in Britain’ (Jonathan Andrews).

Figure 1 Lothian Health Services Archive/SCRAN;

Figure 3 The British Library;

Figure 4 Lothian Health Services Archive/SCRAN;

Figure 5 The Trustees of the National Museums of Scotland/SCRAN.

The following readings appear in Health, Disease and Society in Europe 1800–1930 A Source Book (ed Deborah Brunton), published by Manchester University Press in association with the Open University (2004). Selection and editorial matter copyright © The Open University 2004.

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission:

Exercise 1 Jacyna, L.S. (1988) ‘The laboratory and the clinic: the impact of pathology on surgical diagnosis in the Glasgow Western Infirmary, 1875–1910’, Bulletin of the History of Medicine, vol.62, pp.389–90 and pp.391–4. © The John Hopkins University Press.

Exercise 4 Scull, A. (1993) The Most Solitary of Afflictions. Madness and Society in Britain, 1700–1900, New Haven and London: Yale University Press.

Exercise 5 Walton, J.K. (1985) ‘Casting out and bringing back in Victorian England: pauper lunatics 1840–70’ in W.F. Bynum, Roy Porter and Michael Shepherd (eds) The Anatomy of Madness: Essays in the History of Psychiatry, vol.2, Institutions and Society, London: Tavistock Press, Routledge.

The Trustees of the National Museums of Scotland/SCRAN

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